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Satheeja Santhi, V., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel, Department of Ornamental Horticulture, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Salame, L., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Nakache, Y., Eden Experimental Farm, Bet Shean Valley, Israel
Koltai, H., Department of Ornamental Horticulture, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Soroker, V., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Glazer, I., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
The red palm weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, is a serious pest of date palms. Its larvae bore deep into the trunk disrupt the vascular tissues and kill the infested trees. Behavioral features of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs), reflected by attraction and distribution patterns, are fundamental aspect in determining their parasitic ability and potential management of RPW. We studied the attraction behavior of the EPNs Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora to the RPW under simulated natural conditions in tubes to evaluate their infective potential. In all experiments, a certain proportion of infective juveniles (IJs) (16-20%) stayed near the inoculated site and a major proportion (38-48%) was attracted to the host end. Both H. bacteriophora and S. carpocapsae were efficient crawlers, climbing up and descending when locating their insect host. They were efficiently attracted to the various larval sizes and stages of the RPW life cycle. Host localization by ascending movement was more prominent in S. carpocapsae than in H. bacteriophora. In general, H. bacteriophora is classified as a cruiser forager and S. carpocapsae as an ambusher. However, in this study, we discovered a higher percentage of cruiser foragers among S. carpocapsae IJs. They dispersed much faster and their cruising behavior was prominent characteristic in controlling the cryptic RPW concealed in organic habitats. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
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Attraction of entomopathogenic nematodes steinernema carpocapsae and heterorhabditis bacteriophora to the red palm weevil (rhynchophorus ferrugineus)
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Satheeja Santhi, V., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel, Department of Ornamental Horticulture, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Salame, L., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Nakache, Y., Eden Experimental Farm, Bet Shean Valley, Israel
Koltai, H., Department of Ornamental Horticulture, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Soroker, V., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Glazer, I., Department of Entomology and Nematology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, Israel
Attraction of entomopathogenic nematodes steinernema carpocapsae and heterorhabditis bacteriophora to the red palm weevil (rhynchophorus ferrugineus)
The red palm weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, is a serious pest of date palms. Its larvae bore deep into the trunk disrupt the vascular tissues and kill the infested trees. Behavioral features of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs), reflected by attraction and distribution patterns, are fundamental aspect in determining their parasitic ability and potential management of RPW. We studied the attraction behavior of the EPNs Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora to the RPW under simulated natural conditions in tubes to evaluate their infective potential. In all experiments, a certain proportion of infective juveniles (IJs) (16-20%) stayed near the inoculated site and a major proportion (38-48%) was attracted to the host end. Both H. bacteriophora and S. carpocapsae were efficient crawlers, climbing up and descending when locating their insect host. They were efficiently attracted to the various larval sizes and stages of the RPW life cycle. Host localization by ascending movement was more prominent in S. carpocapsae than in H. bacteriophora. In general, H. bacteriophora is classified as a cruiser forager and S. carpocapsae as an ambusher. However, in this study, we discovered a higher percentage of cruiser foragers among S. carpocapsae IJs. They dispersed much faster and their cruising behavior was prominent characteristic in controlling the cryptic RPW concealed in organic habitats. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
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