Horticultural Reviews
Janick, J., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, United States
Paris, H.S., Department of Vegetable Crops and Plant Genetics, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, PO Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Daunay, M.-C., INRA, UR 1052 Unité de Génétique et d'Amélioration des Fruits et Legumes, F-84140 Montfavet, France
John Gerard (1545-1612) author of the famous English Herball of 1597 and the playwrightWilliam Shakespeare (1564-1616) were contemporaries in London. Their references to cucurbits (Cucurbitaceae) and nightshades (Solanaceae) encapsulate knowledge of these plants from both a botanical and a literary perspective in the English Renaissance. The genera of Cucurbitaceae (Bryonia, Citrullus, Cucumis, Ecballium, Lagenaria, Momordica) and Solanaceae (Atropa, Hyoscyamus, Mandragora, Physalis, Solanum, Withania) had a rich history in both medicine and food production in Antiquity and Medieval times in the Old World. The introduction of new crop genera (Cucurbita, Capsicum, Nicotiana, and other species of Solanaceae) into Europe and Asia after the European encounter with the NewWorld had a profound impact on European botanical science and horticulture. References to cucurbits and nightshades in the 1597 Herball of John Gerard and the plays of Shakespeare reflect scientific and public awareness of these plants in the English Renaissance. © 2012 Wiley-Blackwell. Published 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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The cucurbits and nightshades of renaissance England: John gerard and william shakespeare
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Janick, J., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, United States
Paris, H.S., Department of Vegetable Crops and Plant Genetics, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, PO Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Daunay, M.-C., INRA, UR 1052 Unité de Génétique et d'Amélioration des Fruits et Legumes, F-84140 Montfavet, France
The cucurbits and nightshades of renaissance England: John gerard and william shakespeare
John Gerard (1545-1612) author of the famous English Herball of 1597 and the playwrightWilliam Shakespeare (1564-1616) were contemporaries in London. Their references to cucurbits (Cucurbitaceae) and nightshades (Solanaceae) encapsulate knowledge of these plants from both a botanical and a literary perspective in the English Renaissance. The genera of Cucurbitaceae (Bryonia, Citrullus, Cucumis, Ecballium, Lagenaria, Momordica) and Solanaceae (Atropa, Hyoscyamus, Mandragora, Physalis, Solanum, Withania) had a rich history in both medicine and food production in Antiquity and Medieval times in the Old World. The introduction of new crop genera (Cucurbita, Capsicum, Nicotiana, and other species of Solanaceae) into Europe and Asia after the European encounter with the NewWorld had a profound impact on European botanical science and horticulture. References to cucurbits and nightshades in the 1597 Herball of John Gerard and the plays of Shakespeare reflect scientific and public awareness of these plants in the English Renaissance. © 2012 Wiley-Blackwell. Published 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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