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Kuthiala, A., Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, India
Agarwal, H.C., Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, India
Thompson, M.J., Insect and Nematode Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, Usda, Beltsville, Maryland, United States
Svoboda, J.A., Insect and Nematode Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, Usda, Beltsville, Maryland, United States
Larvae of Spodoptera litura (F.) grown on an artificial diet completed larval development in 19.2 days and attained a maximum weight of 873.2 mg. When fed dietary concentrations of 50 ppm of 25‐azacholesterol or 10 ppm of 25‐azacholestane, the larval developmental period increased to 28.4 and 23.4 days, and the larval weights were 447.5 and 542.3 mg, respectively. Both compounds induced distinct melanization effects and caused production of larval‐pupal intermediates and severe mortality. Treatments with concentrations of 50 ppm or more of either azasteroid caused a decline in pupal period and earlier eclosion and emergence of abnormal adults. Egg laying and hatchability decreased with increasing concentrations of azasteroids in the larval diets. When 1 ppm or more of 25‐azasteroid is added to the artificial diet, the insect larvae contain identifiable amounts of desmosterol, in addition to cholesterol, campesterol, and sitosterol, which are present in Spodoptera grown on artificial diet alone. Desmosterol accumulation in the insect body is due to an inhibition of the Δ24‐sterol reductase by 25‐azasteroids. An increase in the concentration of these azasteroids in the diet results in an increase in sitosterol concentration and simultaneous reduction in the cholesterol levels due to inhibition of conversion of sitosterol. This inhibition appears to be more pronounced with 25‐azacholestane treatment than with 25‐azacholesterol. Copyright © 1987 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
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25‐Azasteroid inhibition of development and conversion of C28 and C29 phytosterols to cholesterol in Spodoptera litura (F.)
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Kuthiala, A., Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, India
Agarwal, H.C., Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, India
Thompson, M.J., Insect and Nematode Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, Usda, Beltsville, Maryland, United States
Svoboda, J.A., Insect and Nematode Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, Usda, Beltsville, Maryland, United States
25‐Azasteroid inhibition of development and conversion of C28 and C29 phytosterols to cholesterol in Spodoptera litura (F.)
Larvae of Spodoptera litura (F.) grown on an artificial diet completed larval development in 19.2 days and attained a maximum weight of 873.2 mg. When fed dietary concentrations of 50 ppm of 25‐azacholesterol or 10 ppm of 25‐azacholestane, the larval developmental period increased to 28.4 and 23.4 days, and the larval weights were 447.5 and 542.3 mg, respectively. Both compounds induced distinct melanization effects and caused production of larval‐pupal intermediates and severe mortality. Treatments with concentrations of 50 ppm or more of either azasteroid caused a decline in pupal period and earlier eclosion and emergence of abnormal adults. Egg laying and hatchability decreased with increasing concentrations of azasteroids in the larval diets. When 1 ppm or more of 25‐azasteroid is added to the artificial diet, the insect larvae contain identifiable amounts of desmosterol, in addition to cholesterol, campesterol, and sitosterol, which are present in Spodoptera grown on artificial diet alone. Desmosterol accumulation in the insect body is due to an inhibition of the Δ24‐sterol reductase by 25‐azasteroids. An increase in the concentration of these azasteroids in the diet results in an increase in sitosterol concentration and simultaneous reduction in the cholesterol levels due to inhibition of conversion of sitosterol. This inhibition appears to be more pronounced with 25‐azacholestane treatment than with 25‐azacholesterol. Copyright © 1987 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
Scientific Publication
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