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Plant physiology (source)

Ferguson, I.B., Hort.& Food Res.Inst.NZ, Auckland, New Zealand
Bowen, J.H., Hort.& Food Res.Inst.NZ, Auckland, New Zealand

Cultured pear (Pyrus communis 1. cv Passe Crassane) cells were subjected to temperatures of 39,42, and 45°C. Heat-shock protein (hsp) synthesis was greater at 39'C than at temperatures above 40'C and continued for up to 8 h. Both cellular uptake of radiolabeled methionine and total protein synthesis were progressively lower as the temperature was increased. Polysome levels decreased immediately when cells were placed at 39 or 42"C, although at 39°C the levels began to recover after 1 h. In cells from both temperatures, reassembly occurred after transfer of cells to 25°C. Four heat-shock-related mRNAs-hspl7, hsp70, and those of two ubiquitin genes-all showed greatest abundance at 39'C and decreased at higher temperatures. Protein degradation increased with time at 42 and 45"C, but at 39°C it increased for the first 2 h and then decreased. In the presence of cycloheximide, which prevented hsp synthesis, protein degradation at 39'C was as great as that at 45°C in the absence of cycloheximide. lhe data suggest that hsps may have a role in protecting proteins from degradation at the permissive temperature of 39°C. At temperatures high enough to inhibit hsp synthesis, protein degradation was enhanced. Although ubiquitin may play a role in specific protein degradation, it does not appear to be involved in increased protein degradation occurring above 40°C.

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Protein synthesis and breakdown during heat shock of cultured pear (Pyrus communis L.) cells
104

Ferguson, I.B., Hort.& Food Res.Inst.NZ, Auckland, New Zealand
Bowen, J.H., Hort.& Food Res.Inst.NZ, Auckland, New Zealand

Protein synthesis and breakdown during heat shock of cultured pear (Pyrus communis L.) cells

Cultured pear (Pyrus communis 1. cv Passe Crassane) cells were subjected to temperatures of 39,42, and 45°C. Heat-shock protein (hsp) synthesis was greater at 39'C than at temperatures above 40'C and continued for up to 8 h. Both cellular uptake of radiolabeled methionine and total protein synthesis were progressively lower as the temperature was increased. Polysome levels decreased immediately when cells were placed at 39 or 42"C, although at 39°C the levels began to recover after 1 h. In cells from both temperatures, reassembly occurred after transfer of cells to 25°C. Four heat-shock-related mRNAs-hspl7, hsp70, and those of two ubiquitin genes-all showed greatest abundance at 39'C and decreased at higher temperatures. Protein degradation increased with time at 42 and 45"C, but at 39°C it increased for the first 2 h and then decreased. In the presence of cycloheximide, which prevented hsp synthesis, protein degradation at 39'C was as great as that at 45°C in the absence of cycloheximide. lhe data suggest that hsps may have a role in protecting proteins from degradation at the permissive temperature of 39°C. At temperatures high enough to inhibit hsp synthesis, protein degradation was enhanced. Although ubiquitin may play a role in specific protein degradation, it does not appear to be involved in increased protein degradation occurring above 40°C.

Scientific Publication
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