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Sarig, Y., Department of Fruit Harvesting, Institute of Agricultural Engineering, ARO, Bet Dagan, Israel
Little, R.W., Bio-Mechanics Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States
Segerlind, L.J., Department of Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States
One of the major causes of mechanical damage incurred in agricultural commodities is attributed to the frequent impacts they receive in harvesting and handling. In agricultural operations, in general, only the local contact phenomenon is considered and the effect of wave propagation is ignored. The punch problem is a special case in the class of contact problems that is of particular practical interest in the impact loading encountered in fruit handling and harvesting. Two potential methods are proposed for analysing the deformation of an elastic sphere encapsulated in an elastic shell and subjected to punch loading. Numerical evaluation of both models showed that the results are comparable. Although more examples related to different geometries and loadings would be required to substantiate the data, the results provide a useful tool for the selected specific geometry which is very common in agriculture. Because good agreement was obtained between the two methods, the choice of which to implement should be made according to the specific problem in question. The Boussinesq method is a more rigorous mathematical approach and, as such, offers a better insight into the actual behaviour of the domain under given boundary conditions. Its utilization is limited to well defined geometrics because of the complexity involved. The finite element method is capable of handling irregular shapes but requires large computer memory for an exact solution. Both methods have been successfully implemented in a practical agricultural problem in an attempt to decrease the mechanical damage encountered during mechanized fruit harvesting. © 1985.
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Comparative solutions for a punch problem of an elastic sphere encapsulated in an elastic shell
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Sarig, Y., Department of Fruit Harvesting, Institute of Agricultural Engineering, ARO, Bet Dagan, Israel
Little, R.W., Bio-Mechanics Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States
Segerlind, L.J., Department of Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States
Comparative solutions for a punch problem of an elastic sphere encapsulated in an elastic shell
One of the major causes of mechanical damage incurred in agricultural commodities is attributed to the frequent impacts they receive in harvesting and handling. In agricultural operations, in general, only the local contact phenomenon is considered and the effect of wave propagation is ignored. The punch problem is a special case in the class of contact problems that is of particular practical interest in the impact loading encountered in fruit handling and harvesting. Two potential methods are proposed for analysing the deformation of an elastic sphere encapsulated in an elastic shell and subjected to punch loading. Numerical evaluation of both models showed that the results are comparable. Although more examples related to different geometries and loadings would be required to substantiate the data, the results provide a useful tool for the selected specific geometry which is very common in agriculture. Because good agreement was obtained between the two methods, the choice of which to implement should be made according to the specific problem in question. The Boussinesq method is a more rigorous mathematical approach and, as such, offers a better insight into the actual behaviour of the domain under given boundary conditions. Its utilization is limited to well defined geometrics because of the complexity involved. The finite element method is capable of handling irregular shapes but requires large computer memory for an exact solution. Both methods have been successfully implemented in a practical agricultural problem in an attempt to decrease the mechanical damage encountered during mechanized fruit harvesting. © 1985.
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