Advanced Search
Steyaert, J.M., Soil, Plant and Ecol. Sci. Division, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand
Ridgway, H.J., Soil, Plant and Ecol. Sci. Division, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand, Natl. Ctr. Adv. Bio-Protection T., Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand
Elad, Y., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Stewart, A., Soil, Plant and Ecol. Sci. Division, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand, Natl. Ctr. Adv. Bio-Protection T., Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand
Biocontrol of fungal plant pathogens through the use of mycoparasitic fungi is an environmentally sustainable approach to management of plant diseases. Mycoparasitism by Trichoderma spp. primarily involves production of cell-wall degrading enzymes. Isolation and characterisation of the corresponding genes have revealed major insights into the underlying genetic basis of mycoparasitism, implicating various regulatory pathways such as carbon and nitrogen catabolite repression. A summary is presented here of the current state of knowledge in molecular regulation of mycoparasitism by Trichoderma species.
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Genetic basis of mycoparasitism: A mechanism of biological control by species of Trichoderma
31
Steyaert, J.M., Soil, Plant and Ecol. Sci. Division, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand
Ridgway, H.J., Soil, Plant and Ecol. Sci. Division, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand, Natl. Ctr. Adv. Bio-Protection T., Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand
Elad, Y., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Stewart, A., Soil, Plant and Ecol. Sci. Division, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand, Natl. Ctr. Adv. Bio-Protection T., Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Canterbury, New Zealand
Genetic basis of mycoparasitism: A mechanism of biological control by species of Trichoderma
Biocontrol of fungal plant pathogens through the use of mycoparasitic fungi is an environmentally sustainable approach to management of plant diseases. Mycoparasitism by Trichoderma spp. primarily involves production of cell-wall degrading enzymes. Isolation and characterisation of the corresponding genes have revealed major insights into the underlying genetic basis of mycoparasitism, implicating various regulatory pathways such as carbon and nitrogen catabolite repression. A summary is presented here of the current state of knowledge in molecular regulation of mycoparasitism by Trichoderma species.
Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in