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Ben-Gal, A., Arava Res. and Dev., mobile post, Eilot 88820, Israel
Dudley, L.M., Utah State Univ., Plant Soils and Meteorology Dep., 4820 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, United States
Phosphorous fertigation applied in a microirrigation system provides increased P use efficiency relative to traditional banding. This project investigated the hypothesis that continuous, low-intensity irrigation can provide plants with available P more efficiently than intermittent drip fertigation. Objectives of the study were to characterize water and P distribution when provided to soil by a continuous point source, and to raise P fertilizer efficiency by increasing plant available P without augmenting P application rates through maintenance of relatively constant conditions within the root zone. Plant response, soil P distribution, and soil moisture were compared for an intermittent irrigation regime, giving water for 4 h once every 2 d, to continuous application of the same amount of water in both a water-solute simulation model (Hydrus-2d) and in greenhouse-lysimeter experiments with and without a corn crop on a calcareous sandy loam soil. Results front both the simulation and the lysimeter-soil study showed that the hypothesized zones of increased available P materialized when P-laden water was applied continuously at low application rates to an un-cropped soil. Extractable P concentrations in the soil immediately surrounding the point source were found to be 20 to 25% higher in continuously irrigated soil as compared with pulsed irrigation. After 40 d of growth, corn plants grown under continuous fertigation yielded 20% greater biomass than plants irrigated with the same water quantity and quality once every 2 d. Phosphorus content of corn leaves was 25% greater for the continuous treatment as compared with the pulsed treatment.
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Phosphorus availability under continuous point source irrigation
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Ben-Gal, A., Arava Res. and Dev., mobile post, Eilot 88820, Israel
Dudley, L.M., Utah State Univ., Plant Soils and Meteorology Dep., 4820 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, United States
Phosphorus availability under continuous point source irrigation
Phosphorous fertigation applied in a microirrigation system provides increased P use efficiency relative to traditional banding. This project investigated the hypothesis that continuous, low-intensity irrigation can provide plants with available P more efficiently than intermittent drip fertigation. Objectives of the study were to characterize water and P distribution when provided to soil by a continuous point source, and to raise P fertilizer efficiency by increasing plant available P without augmenting P application rates through maintenance of relatively constant conditions within the root zone. Plant response, soil P distribution, and soil moisture were compared for an intermittent irrigation regime, giving water for 4 h once every 2 d, to continuous application of the same amount of water in both a water-solute simulation model (Hydrus-2d) and in greenhouse-lysimeter experiments with and without a corn crop on a calcareous sandy loam soil. Results front both the simulation and the lysimeter-soil study showed that the hypothesized zones of increased available P materialized when P-laden water was applied continuously at low application rates to an un-cropped soil. Extractable P concentrations in the soil immediately surrounding the point source were found to be 20 to 25% higher in continuously irrigated soil as compared with pulsed irrigation. After 40 d of growth, corn plants grown under continuous fertigation yielded 20% greater biomass than plants irrigated with the same water quantity and quality once every 2 d. Phosphorus content of corn leaves was 25% greater for the continuous treatment as compared with the pulsed treatment.
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