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Water, Sodium, Potassium, and Chlorine Metabolism of Dairy Cows at the Onset of Lactation in Hot Weather
Year:
1991
Source of publication :
Journal of Dairy Science
Authors :
Shalit, U.
;
.
Silanikove, Nissim
;
.
Volume :
74
Co-Authors:
Shalit, U., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Male, E., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Silanikove, N., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Berman, A., Department of Animal Sciences, Hebrew University, Rehwot, Israel
Shalit, U., Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Maltz, E., Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Silanikove, N., Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Berman, A., Hebrew University, Rehovot, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
1874
To page:
1883
(
Total pages:
10
)
Abstract:
Water, Na, K, and Cl balances, blood plasma composition, and urine and fecal outputs were studied in 5 high yielding cows (>30 kg/d milk) at 2 wk prepartum and at 2 and 7 wk postpartum during the summer in Israel. Cows were fed complete diets with electrolyte content exceeding dietary recommendations. Plasma volume, as assessed by hematocrit changes, was greater postpartum, probably due to increased heat load and water turnover. Milk secretion markedly increased electrolyte output, which was compensated for only partially by increased intake. This was associated with marked reduction of electrolyte losses in excreta, particularly that of Na and C1. On the basis of urea excreted in the urine, it seems that the c m n t practice of abruptly increasing protein content of the diet at the onset of lactation might reduce the efficiency of dietary protein utilization, compared with efficiency of protein utilization at a later stage of lactation. The need to excrete excessive N also adversely affected the water and electrolyte balances. At initiation of lactation, when DMI is still limited and hot weather obstructs its rapid increase, the current recommendations for electrolytes as a percentage of the ration do not meet the needs. © 2012 American Dairy Science Association.
Note:
Related Files :
Animal
Blood
cattle
Female
Israel
lactation
metabolism
milk
Osmolarity
sweating
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(91)78353-7
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
27107
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:28
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Water, Sodium, Potassium, and Chlorine Metabolism of Dairy Cows at the Onset of Lactation in Hot Weather
74
Shalit, U., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Male, E., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Silanikove, N., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Berman, A., Department of Animal Sciences, Hebrew University, Rehwot, Israel
Shalit, U., Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Maltz, E., Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Silanikove, N., Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Berman, A., Hebrew University, Rehovot, Israel
Water, Sodium, Potassium, and Chlorine Metabolism of Dairy Cows at the Onset of Lactation in Hot Weather
Water, Na, K, and Cl balances, blood plasma composition, and urine and fecal outputs were studied in 5 high yielding cows (>30 kg/d milk) at 2 wk prepartum and at 2 and 7 wk postpartum during the summer in Israel. Cows were fed complete diets with electrolyte content exceeding dietary recommendations. Plasma volume, as assessed by hematocrit changes, was greater postpartum, probably due to increased heat load and water turnover. Milk secretion markedly increased electrolyte output, which was compensated for only partially by increased intake. This was associated with marked reduction of electrolyte losses in excreta, particularly that of Na and C1. On the basis of urea excreted in the urine, it seems that the c m n t practice of abruptly increasing protein content of the diet at the onset of lactation might reduce the efficiency of dietary protein utilization, compared with efficiency of protein utilization at a later stage of lactation. The need to excrete excessive N also adversely affected the water and electrolyte balances. At initiation of lactation, when DMI is still limited and hot weather obstructs its rapid increase, the current recommendations for electrolytes as a percentage of the ration do not meet the needs. © 2012 American Dairy Science Association.
Scientific Publication
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