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Numerical analysis of transport of trifluralin from a subsurface dripper
Year:
2001
Authors :
Gerstl, Zev
;
.
Laufer, Asher
;
.
Russo, David
;
.
Volume :
65
Co-Authors:
Russo, D., Department of Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Zaidel, J., Department of Environmental Physics and Irrigation, AGRA Earth and Environmental Ltd., 160 Traders Blvd. East, Mississauga, Ont. L4Z 3K7, Canada
Laufer, A., Department of Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Gerstl, Z., Department of Soil Physical and Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
1648
To page:
1658
(
Total pages:
11
)
Abstract:
The transport of a pulse of trifluralin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-[trifluoromethyl] benzenamime) applied via a subsurfacedripper was analyzed numerically. Results of the analyses suggest that the movement and spread of trifluralin in the soil is considerably retarded by its strong adsorption to the solid phase of the soil. This is particularly so in soils which contain aconsiderable fraction of organic C and in fine-textured (clayey) soils with low hydraulic conductivity and high water retentivity. Water uptake by plant roots and the resultant rapid decrease of water velocity with increasing distance from the dripper restricts further the downward movement of trifluralin and its potential to pollute the groundwater. The presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the irrigation water may enhance both the movement and the spread of trifluralin in the soil, particularly in coarse-textured soils with a relatively small fraction of organic C. Because of the strong adsorption of trifluralin to the soil, its concentration in the aqueous phase of the soil is very low and it decreases further with increasing time because of degradation and nonequilibrium sorption. This is particularly so in coarse-textured soils with a relatively large fraction of organic C. Nevertheless, results of the analyses suggest that for soils of quite widely differing textures and organic C contents, a trifluralin concentration of c1 = 10-6 kg m-3 may persist in the vicinity of the dripper for a relatively long period of time (90 d) even with relatively small applied mass (3 × 10-5 kg).
Note:
Related Files :
Adsorption
Degradation
groundwater
irrigation
Retentivity
Soils
Solute transport
Trifluralin
water pollution
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
27391
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:30
Scientific Publication
Numerical analysis of transport of trifluralin from a subsurface dripper
65
Russo, D., Department of Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Zaidel, J., Department of Environmental Physics and Irrigation, AGRA Earth and Environmental Ltd., 160 Traders Blvd. East, Mississauga, Ont. L4Z 3K7, Canada
Laufer, A., Department of Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Gerstl, Z., Department of Soil Physical and Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Numerical analysis of transport of trifluralin from a subsurface dripper
The transport of a pulse of trifluralin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-[trifluoromethyl] benzenamime) applied via a subsurfacedripper was analyzed numerically. Results of the analyses suggest that the movement and spread of trifluralin in the soil is considerably retarded by its strong adsorption to the solid phase of the soil. This is particularly so in soils which contain aconsiderable fraction of organic C and in fine-textured (clayey) soils with low hydraulic conductivity and high water retentivity. Water uptake by plant roots and the resultant rapid decrease of water velocity with increasing distance from the dripper restricts further the downward movement of trifluralin and its potential to pollute the groundwater. The presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the irrigation water may enhance both the movement and the spread of trifluralin in the soil, particularly in coarse-textured soils with a relatively small fraction of organic C. Because of the strong adsorption of trifluralin to the soil, its concentration in the aqueous phase of the soil is very low and it decreases further with increasing time because of degradation and nonequilibrium sorption. This is particularly so in coarse-textured soils with a relatively large fraction of organic C. Nevertheless, results of the analyses suggest that for soils of quite widely differing textures and organic C contents, a trifluralin concentration of c1 = 10-6 kg m-3 may persist in the vicinity of the dripper for a relatively long period of time (90 d) even with relatively small applied mass (3 × 10-5 kg).
Scientific Publication
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