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Eucalyptus plantations in Israel: An assessment of economic and environmental viability
Year:
2008
Source of publication :
New Forests
Authors :
Zohar, Yechiel
;
.
Volume :
36
Co-Authors:
Zohar, Y., Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Gafni, A., Jewish National Fund (JNF-KKL), Eshtaol, Mobile Post Shimshon 99775, Israel
Morris, J., School of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Burnley Campus, 500 Yarra Boulevard, Richmond, VIC 3121, Australia
Shalhevet, S., Shalhevet Consulting, 126 Thorndike Street, Brookline, MA 02446, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
135
To page:
157
(
Total pages:
23
)
Abstract:
This paper discusses a plantation management approach involving a combination of "short" and "long" rotations designed to allow farmers to receive income from trees as soon as possible after establishment. We present results from two plots that represent extreme conditions: (a) a seasonally waterlogged, non-saline site (Nahalal), and (b) a saline site (Ginnegar) located in the Yizre'el Valley, Israel. Six improved seed sources, four of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and two of E. occidentalis, were examined. The local Israeli seed source of E. camaldulensis (HA) performed best at both sites. In Nahalal, the short rotation thinning of the slower growing (50%) plantation trees could provide economic returns approximately five years after establishment. The calculated mean annual increment (MAI) of these trees reached 12.2 t ha-1year-1. The long rotation, or better performing half of the plantation trees, could be used as a source of sawn timber, providing higher-value products. By nine years after establishment, the average DBH of the various seed sources reached 25.8 ± 1.9 cm. The calculated MAI of the combined cutting rotations reached 48.3 t ha-1 year-1. Eucalyptus grown under the combined (short- and long-term) management approach at Nahalal was more profitable than many other non-irrigated local crops. Eucalyptus production in Ginnegar would be less profitable than in Nahalal. However, an additional ecological benefit was provided by the crop's ability to lower the water table. When this contribution to regional drainage is taken into account, trees become economically competitive with other non-irrigated field crops under saline conditions. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Note:
Related Files :
clearcutting
Economic Analysis
Eucalyptus
Forestry
Israel
Nahalal
seeds
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1007/s11056-008-9089-4
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
27533
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:31
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Scientific Publication
Eucalyptus plantations in Israel: An assessment of economic and environmental viability
36
Zohar, Y., Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Gafni, A., Jewish National Fund (JNF-KKL), Eshtaol, Mobile Post Shimshon 99775, Israel
Morris, J., School of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Burnley Campus, 500 Yarra Boulevard, Richmond, VIC 3121, Australia
Shalhevet, S., Shalhevet Consulting, 126 Thorndike Street, Brookline, MA 02446, United States
Eucalyptus plantations in Israel: An assessment of economic and environmental viability
This paper discusses a plantation management approach involving a combination of "short" and "long" rotations designed to allow farmers to receive income from trees as soon as possible after establishment. We present results from two plots that represent extreme conditions: (a) a seasonally waterlogged, non-saline site (Nahalal), and (b) a saline site (Ginnegar) located in the Yizre'el Valley, Israel. Six improved seed sources, four of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and two of E. occidentalis, were examined. The local Israeli seed source of E. camaldulensis (HA) performed best at both sites. In Nahalal, the short rotation thinning of the slower growing (50%) plantation trees could provide economic returns approximately five years after establishment. The calculated mean annual increment (MAI) of these trees reached 12.2 t ha-1year-1. The long rotation, or better performing half of the plantation trees, could be used as a source of sawn timber, providing higher-value products. By nine years after establishment, the average DBH of the various seed sources reached 25.8 ± 1.9 cm. The calculated MAI of the combined cutting rotations reached 48.3 t ha-1 year-1. Eucalyptus grown under the combined (short- and long-term) management approach at Nahalal was more profitable than many other non-irrigated local crops. Eucalyptus production in Ginnegar would be less profitable than in Nahalal. However, an additional ecological benefit was provided by the crop's ability to lower the water table. When this contribution to regional drainage is taken into account, trees become economically competitive with other non-irrigated field crops under saline conditions. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Scientific Publication
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