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Comparative analysis of cultivated melon groups (Cucumis melo L.) using random amplified polymorphic DNA and simple sequence repeat markers
Year:
2000
Source of publication :
Euphytica
Authors :
Katzir, Nurit
;
.
Reis, Noa
;
.
Volume :
115
Co-Authors:
Staub, J.E., Department of Horticulture, Vegetable Crops Unit, University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, United States
Danin-Poleg, Y., Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel
Fazio, G., Department of Horticulture, Vegetable Crops Unit, University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, United States
Horejsi, T., Department of Horticulture, Vegetable Crops Unit, University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, United States
Reis, N., Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel
Katzir, N., Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
225
To page:
241
(
Total pages:
17
)
Abstract:
Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to characterize genetic relationships among 46 accessions in two C. melo L. subsp. melo (Cantalupensis, Inodorus) and subsp. agrestis (Conomon, and Flexuosus) groups. Genetic distance (GD) estimates were made among and between accessions in four melon market classes [Galia, Ogen, Charentais, and Shipper (European and U.S. types)] of Cantalupensis, one market class of Inodorus (Cassaba and Honey Dew), one accession of Conomon, and one accession of Flexuosus by employing three GD estimators; simple matching coefficient, Jaccard's coefficient, and Nei's distance-D. Differences detected among 135 RAPD bands and 54 SSR bands (products of 17 SSR primers) were used to calculate GD. Band polymorphisms observed with 21 RAPD primers and 7 SSR primers were important (p =0.01) in the detection of genetic differences. Estimators of GD were highly correlated (p > 0.0001; r(s) = 0.64 to 0.99) when comparisons were made between estimation methods within a particular marker system. Lower correlations (r(s) = 0.17 to 0.40) were detected (P > 0.001) between marker systems using any one estimator. The GD of the Conomon and Flexuosus accessions was significantly different (p > 0.001) from the mean GD of all the market classes examined. The mean GD (Jaccard's coefficient) among accessions of Ogen, Galia, Cassaba, Charentais, European shipper, and U.S. shipper groups was 0.11 ± 0.04, 0.33 ± 0.09, 0.21 ± 0.04, 0.26 ± 0.10, 0.17 ± 0.05, and 0.22 ± 0.08, respectively. Market classes were distinct (p > 0.001), such that GDs between Galia and other accessions were the largest (mean GD 0.34 to 0.35), and GDs between Ogen and other accessions were the smallest (mean GD 0.29 to 0.30). Contrasts between the U.S. shipper cultivar Top Mark and accessions within any market class was relatively large (mean GD = 0.42 ± 0.06). Empirical estimations of variances associated with each marker type in the accessions examined indicated that, per band, lower coefficients of variation can be attained in the estimation of GD when using RAPDs compared to SSRs. Nevertheless, the genetic relationships identified using these markers were generally similar. The disparity between the analyses of the two markers made may be related to the amount of genome coverage which is characteristic of a particular marker system and/or its efficiency in sampling variation in a population. Results of RAPD marker analysis suggest that 80 marker bands were adequate for assessing the genetic variation present in the accessions examined.
Note:
Related Files :
Genetic distance
genetic variance
Gerplasm management
market
Plant germplasm
RAPD
simple sequence repeat
United States
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More details
DOI :
10.1023/A:1004054014174
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
27596
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:32
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Scientific Publication
Comparative analysis of cultivated melon groups (Cucumis melo L.) using random amplified polymorphic DNA and simple sequence repeat markers
115
Staub, J.E., Department of Horticulture, Vegetable Crops Unit, University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, United States
Danin-Poleg, Y., Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel
Fazio, G., Department of Horticulture, Vegetable Crops Unit, University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, United States
Horejsi, T., Department of Horticulture, Vegetable Crops Unit, University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, United States
Reis, N., Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel
Katzir, N., Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel
Comparative analysis of cultivated melon groups (Cucumis melo L.) using random amplified polymorphic DNA and simple sequence repeat markers
Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to characterize genetic relationships among 46 accessions in two C. melo L. subsp. melo (Cantalupensis, Inodorus) and subsp. agrestis (Conomon, and Flexuosus) groups. Genetic distance (GD) estimates were made among and between accessions in four melon market classes [Galia, Ogen, Charentais, and Shipper (European and U.S. types)] of Cantalupensis, one market class of Inodorus (Cassaba and Honey Dew), one accession of Conomon, and one accession of Flexuosus by employing three GD estimators; simple matching coefficient, Jaccard's coefficient, and Nei's distance-D. Differences detected among 135 RAPD bands and 54 SSR bands (products of 17 SSR primers) were used to calculate GD. Band polymorphisms observed with 21 RAPD primers and 7 SSR primers were important (p =0.01) in the detection of genetic differences. Estimators of GD were highly correlated (p > 0.0001; r(s) = 0.64 to 0.99) when comparisons were made between estimation methods within a particular marker system. Lower correlations (r(s) = 0.17 to 0.40) were detected (P > 0.001) between marker systems using any one estimator. The GD of the Conomon and Flexuosus accessions was significantly different (p > 0.001) from the mean GD of all the market classes examined. The mean GD (Jaccard's coefficient) among accessions of Ogen, Galia, Cassaba, Charentais, European shipper, and U.S. shipper groups was 0.11 ± 0.04, 0.33 ± 0.09, 0.21 ± 0.04, 0.26 ± 0.10, 0.17 ± 0.05, and 0.22 ± 0.08, respectively. Market classes were distinct (p > 0.001), such that GDs between Galia and other accessions were the largest (mean GD 0.34 to 0.35), and GDs between Ogen and other accessions were the smallest (mean GD 0.29 to 0.30). Contrasts between the U.S. shipper cultivar Top Mark and accessions within any market class was relatively large (mean GD = 0.42 ± 0.06). Empirical estimations of variances associated with each marker type in the accessions examined indicated that, per band, lower coefficients of variation can be attained in the estimation of GD when using RAPDs compared to SSRs. Nevertheless, the genetic relationships identified using these markers were generally similar. The disparity between the analyses of the two markers made may be related to the amount of genome coverage which is characteristic of a particular marker system and/or its efficiency in sampling variation in a population. Results of RAPD marker analysis suggest that 80 marker bands were adequate for assessing the genetic variation present in the accessions examined.
Scientific Publication
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