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Location and behavioral effects of lectin binding on entomopathogenic nematodes with different foraging strategies
Year:
1996
Source of publication :
Journal of Chemical Ecology
Authors :
Glazer, Itamar
;
.
Volume :
22
Co-Authors:
Lewis, E.E., Department of Entomology, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 08903-0231, New Jersey, United States
Glazer, I., Department of Nematology, Volcani Center, ARO, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Gaugler, R., Department of Entomology, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 08903-0231, New Jersey, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
455
To page:
466
(
Total pages:
12
)
Abstract:
Lectins have been used to locate and ascribe a function to sensory organs of nematodes. We had two objectives: (1) to determine the location of carbohydrate exudates on the surface of three species of entomopathogenic nematodes with different foraging strategies and (2) to evaluate the importance of carbohydrates in host finding and recognition. Steinernema carpocapsae finds hosts by ambushing, and most individuals respond poorly to host cues. No specific areas of lectin binding were recorded for this species. Wheat germ agglutinin bound specifically to the anterior region of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and to the anterior and posterior of S. glaseri. These two nematode species are cruise foragers and are highly responsive to host cues. The behavioral effects of lectins varied. None of the species' responses to volatile host cues was affected. S. carpocapsae's rate of attachment during ambushing was increased by treatment with WGA, and this effect was negated by treatment with a competing sugar (N-acetylglucosamine). The infectivity of S. glaseri in an assay that required movement through 5 cm of sand to find the host was significantly decreased by treatment with WGA. © 1996 Plenum Publishing Corporation.
Note:
Related Files :
Behavior
biological control
Ecology
Entomopathogenic nematodes
foraging
insects
lectins
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1007/BF02033648
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:

Itamar's own PDF.

ID:
27748
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:33
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Scientific Publication
Location and behavioral effects of lectin binding on entomopathogenic nematodes with different foraging strategies
22
Lewis, E.E., Department of Entomology, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 08903-0231, New Jersey, United States
Glazer, I., Department of Nematology, Volcani Center, ARO, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Gaugler, R., Department of Entomology, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 08903-0231, New Jersey, United States
Location and behavioral effects of lectin binding on entomopathogenic nematodes with different foraging strategies
Lectins have been used to locate and ascribe a function to sensory organs of nematodes. We had two objectives: (1) to determine the location of carbohydrate exudates on the surface of three species of entomopathogenic nematodes with different foraging strategies and (2) to evaluate the importance of carbohydrates in host finding and recognition. Steinernema carpocapsae finds hosts by ambushing, and most individuals respond poorly to host cues. No specific areas of lectin binding were recorded for this species. Wheat germ agglutinin bound specifically to the anterior region of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and to the anterior and posterior of S. glaseri. These two nematode species are cruise foragers and are highly responsive to host cues. The behavioral effects of lectins varied. None of the species' responses to volatile host cues was affected. S. carpocapsae's rate of attachment during ambushing was increased by treatment with WGA, and this effect was negated by treatment with a competing sugar (N-acetylglucosamine). The infectivity of S. glaseri in an assay that required movement through 5 cm of sand to find the host was significantly decreased by treatment with WGA. © 1996 Plenum Publishing Corporation.
Scientific Publication
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