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Boron adsorption by soils as affected by dissolved organic matter from treated sewage effluent
Year:
2008
Authors :
Communar, Gregory M.
;
.
Keren, Rami
;
.
Volume :
72
Co-Authors:
Communar, G., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sci., Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Keren, R., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sci., Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
492
To page:
499
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
Although it is well known that treated sewage effluent enhances trace elements and nutrient solubility in soil solution through their complexation with dissolved organic matter (DOM), no information is available yet for B. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of DOM with B and native soil organic matter (OM) on B adsorption by soils. Batch equilibrium studies were conducted to measure the B adsorption by DOM (pH 7.7) that was selected from a municipal sewage plant. Effluent DOM was found to have a low affinity for the soils and its application resulted in a release of native soil OM into solution. The OM release was enhanced significantly by an increase in soil mass/solution volume ratio and effluent DOM concentration. The B adsorption capacity of DOM (294-333 mg kg-1) was less than that found for different humic acids (583-2235.6 mg kg-1). Nevertheless, the presence of DOM reduced the free-B concentration in solution due to formation of B-DOM complexes. As the total DOM concentration increased, the slope of the isotherms for B adsorption by soil decreased. All the B adsorption isotherms obtained for the different DOM concentrations merged into one isotherm, however, when free-B solution concentration was taken into consideration. The results suggest that the B-DOM complex did not interact with the soil. © Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.
Note:
Related Files :
Adsorption
Biological materials
Boron
Concentration (process)
dissolved organic matter
Nutrients
sewage
trace elements
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.2136/sssaj2007.0086
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
27816
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:34
Scientific Publication
Boron adsorption by soils as affected by dissolved organic matter from treated sewage effluent
72
Communar, G., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sci., Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Keren, R., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sci., Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Boron adsorption by soils as affected by dissolved organic matter from treated sewage effluent
Although it is well known that treated sewage effluent enhances trace elements and nutrient solubility in soil solution through their complexation with dissolved organic matter (DOM), no information is available yet for B. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of DOM with B and native soil organic matter (OM) on B adsorption by soils. Batch equilibrium studies were conducted to measure the B adsorption by DOM (pH 7.7) that was selected from a municipal sewage plant. Effluent DOM was found to have a low affinity for the soils and its application resulted in a release of native soil OM into solution. The OM release was enhanced significantly by an increase in soil mass/solution volume ratio and effluent DOM concentration. The B adsorption capacity of DOM (294-333 mg kg-1) was less than that found for different humic acids (583-2235.6 mg kg-1). Nevertheless, the presence of DOM reduced the free-B concentration in solution due to formation of B-DOM complexes. As the total DOM concentration increased, the slope of the isotherms for B adsorption by soil decreased. All the B adsorption isotherms obtained for the different DOM concentrations merged into one isotherm, however, when free-B solution concentration was taken into consideration. The results suggest that the B-DOM complex did not interact with the soil. © Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.
Scientific Publication
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