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Experimental Agriculture
Klein, J.D., Volcani Center-ARO, Institute of Field and Garden Crops, Department of Agronomy and Natural Resources, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Hebbe, Y., Institute for Agricultural Research According to the Torah, MP Emeq Soreq 76812, Israel
Seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were coated with a range of vegetable oils before sowing, in an effort to provide a hydrophobic coating that would only dissolve or wash away in the presence of sufficient water to maintain continued seedling growth. Germination of oil-treated seeds was reduced by 20–50% and time to 50% emergence was increased by two to five days. Treating pesticide-coated seeds with vegetable oil further decreased germination and extended time to emergence. Oil treatment did not decrease water uptake or affect seed respiration. Degree of saturation and linoleic acid:oleic acid ratio were not correlated with the effects of the various oils. The decreased germination and delayed emergence associated with the oil treatment were probably due to physiological rather than physical factors. © 1995, Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.
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Effect of the Treatment of Wheat Seeds with Vegetable Oils on Germination and Emergence
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Klein, J.D., Volcani Center-ARO, Institute of Field and Garden Crops, Department of Agronomy and Natural Resources, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Hebbe, Y., Institute for Agricultural Research According to the Torah, MP Emeq Soreq 76812, Israel
Effect of the Treatment of Wheat Seeds with Vegetable Oils on Germination and Emergence
Seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were coated with a range of vegetable oils before sowing, in an effort to provide a hydrophobic coating that would only dissolve or wash away in the presence of sufficient water to maintain continued seedling growth. Germination of oil-treated seeds was reduced by 20–50% and time to 50% emergence was increased by two to five days. Treating pesticide-coated seeds with vegetable oil further decreased germination and extended time to emergence. Oil treatment did not decrease water uptake or affect seed respiration. Degree of saturation and linoleic acid:oleic acid ratio were not correlated with the effects of the various oils. The decreased germination and delayed emergence associated with the oil treatment were probably due to physiological rather than physical factors. © 1995, Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.
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