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Nasser, A., Department of Environmental Sciences, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-0231, United States
Sposito, G., Earth Sciences Division, Mail Stop 90/1116, Lawrence B., Berkeley, CA 94720, United States
Cheney, M.A., Department of Environmental Sciences, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-0231, United States
Mechanochemical degradation of 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) adsorbed on synthetic birnessite (δ-MnO2) was investigated using heat conduction calorimetry. The overall transformation kinetics of 2,4-D on birnessite after light grinding were approximately first-order, with an apparent activation energy of approximately 37 kJ mol-1 for the range of temperatures 10-50°C. The two decomposition products detected under mechanochemical degradation and incubation were 2,4-dichlorophenol and CO2, but no consumption of gaseous oxygen was detected. A positive correlation was found between Mn(II) produced and CO2 evolved, suggesting that the decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenol involves the oxide substrate as a source of oxygen and yields Mn(II). (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Mechanochemical degradation of 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) adsorbed on synthetic birnessite (δ-MnO2) was investigated using heat conduction calorimetry. The overall transformation kinetics of 2,4-D on birnessite after light grinding were approximately first-order, with an apparent activation energy of approximately 37 kJ mol-1 for the range of temperatures 10-50 °C. The two decomposition products detected under mechanochemical degradation and incubation were 2,4-dichlorophenol and CO2, but no consumption of gaseous oxygen was detected. A positive correlation was found between Mn(II) produced and CO2 evolved, suggesting that the decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenol involves the oxide substrate as a source of oxygen and yields Mn(II).
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Mechanochemical degradation of 2,4-D adsorbed on synthetic birnessite
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Nasser, A., Department of Environmental Sciences, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-0231, United States
Sposito, G., Earth Sciences Division, Mail Stop 90/1116, Lawrence B., Berkeley, CA 94720, United States
Cheney, M.A., Department of Environmental Sciences, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-0231, United States
Mechanochemical degradation of 2,4-D adsorbed on synthetic birnessite
Mechanochemical degradation of 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) adsorbed on synthetic birnessite (δ-MnO2) was investigated using heat conduction calorimetry. The overall transformation kinetics of 2,4-D on birnessite after light grinding were approximately first-order, with an apparent activation energy of approximately 37 kJ mol-1 for the range of temperatures 10-50°C. The two decomposition products detected under mechanochemical degradation and incubation were 2,4-dichlorophenol and CO2, but no consumption of gaseous oxygen was detected. A positive correlation was found between Mn(II) produced and CO2 evolved, suggesting that the decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenol involves the oxide substrate as a source of oxygen and yields Mn(II). (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Mechanochemical degradation of 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) adsorbed on synthetic birnessite (δ-MnO2) was investigated using heat conduction calorimetry. The overall transformation kinetics of 2,4-D on birnessite after light grinding were approximately first-order, with an apparent activation energy of approximately 37 kJ mol-1 for the range of temperatures 10-50 °C. The two decomposition products detected under mechanochemical degradation and incubation were 2,4-dichlorophenol and CO2, but no consumption of gaseous oxygen was detected. A positive correlation was found between Mn(II) produced and CO2 evolved, suggesting that the decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenol involves the oxide substrate as a source of oxygen and yields Mn(II).
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