Journal of Dairy Science
Ashwell, M.S., Department of Animal Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States, Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Heyen, D.W., Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States
Weller, J.I., Institute of Animal Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Ron, M., Institute of Animal Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Sonstegard, T.S., Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Van Tassell, C.P., Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Lewin, H.A., Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States
An extension of our previous genome scan of a North American Holstein-Friesian population was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting conformation traits. Resource families consisted of 1404 sons of 10 elite sires. Genome coverage was estimated to be 2713.5 cM (90%) for 406 markers using a granddaughter design. Regression interval mapping was used to detect QTL affecting 22 conformation traits, including body, udder, feet and legs, and dairy conformation as well as calving ease. Analysis of the families jointly identified 41 chromosome-wise significant QTL influencing conformation traits and 3 significant QTL influencing calving ease on 20 chromosomes. The false discovery rate method was used to account for multiple testing and 3/4 of the suggestive and 5/6 of significant QTL should be real effects. Fourteen of the 44 QTL were significant at the genome-wise level. Comparison of these results with other published reports identifies common QTL affecting conformation traits. Regions on 10 chromosomes appear to affect multiple traits, including conformation, milk production, and somatic cell score, within these particular US Holstein families. Additional work is needed to determine the precise locations of the QTL and select positional candidate genes influencing these traits. © American Dairy Science Association, 2005.
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Detection of quantitative trait loci influencing conformation traits and calving ease in Holstein-Friesian cattle
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Ashwell, M.S., Department of Animal Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States, Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Heyen, D.W., Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States
Weller, J.I., Institute of Animal Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Ron, M., Institute of Animal Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Sonstegard, T.S., Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Van Tassell, C.P., Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Lewin, H.A., Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States
Detection of quantitative trait loci influencing conformation traits and calving ease in Holstein-Friesian cattle
An extension of our previous genome scan of a North American Holstein-Friesian population was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting conformation traits. Resource families consisted of 1404 sons of 10 elite sires. Genome coverage was estimated to be 2713.5 cM (90%) for 406 markers using a granddaughter design. Regression interval mapping was used to detect QTL affecting 22 conformation traits, including body, udder, feet and legs, and dairy conformation as well as calving ease. Analysis of the families jointly identified 41 chromosome-wise significant QTL influencing conformation traits and 3 significant QTL influencing calving ease on 20 chromosomes. The false discovery rate method was used to account for multiple testing and 3/4 of the suggestive and 5/6 of significant QTL should be real effects. Fourteen of the 44 QTL were significant at the genome-wise level. Comparison of these results with other published reports identifies common QTL affecting conformation traits. Regions on 10 chromosomes appear to affect multiple traits, including conformation, milk production, and somatic cell score, within these particular US Holstein families. Additional work is needed to determine the precise locations of the QTL and select positional candidate genes influencing these traits. © American Dairy Science Association, 2005.
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