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David-Schwartz, R., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Borovsky, Y., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Zemach, H., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Paran, I., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
The angiosperm shoot apical meristem (SAM) is characterized by tightly organized cell layers and zones. The SAM's organization allows it to maintain its indeterminate nature while producing determinate lateral organs. Alterations in SAM gene expression partly account for the immense diversity in plant architecture. The GRAS protein family gene HAIRY MERISTEM (HAM) is an important regulator of SAM organization in Petunia and Arabidopsis. Here we describe CaHAM loss-of-function pepper mutants characterized by an arrested SAM following the formation of several leaves on the primary stem, complete inhibition of axillary meristem development, an expanded tunica domain and trichome formation on the SAM epidermis. CaHAM is expressed in the periphery of the SAM and in the vasculature of young leaves throughout plant development, reaching its highest level in the reproductive growth stage. Analysis of the effect of CaHAM loss-of-function on its own expression showed that CaHAM is negatively autoregulated. Furthermore, CaHAM negatively regulates the expression level and pattern of pepper SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (CaSTM), which is required to maintain the SAM in an undifferentiated state. We conclude that CaHAM is regulated to achieve adjusted functional levels and has a conserved role in controlling SAM maintenance, organization and axillary meristem formation. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
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CaHAM is autoregulated and regulates CaSTM expression and is required for shoot apical meristem organization in pepper
203-204
David-Schwartz, R., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Borovsky, Y., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Zemach, H., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Paran, I., Institute of Plant Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
CaHAM is autoregulated and regulates CaSTM expression and is required for shoot apical meristem organization in pepper
The angiosperm shoot apical meristem (SAM) is characterized by tightly organized cell layers and zones. The SAM's organization allows it to maintain its indeterminate nature while producing determinate lateral organs. Alterations in SAM gene expression partly account for the immense diversity in plant architecture. The GRAS protein family gene HAIRY MERISTEM (HAM) is an important regulator of SAM organization in Petunia and Arabidopsis. Here we describe CaHAM loss-of-function pepper mutants characterized by an arrested SAM following the formation of several leaves on the primary stem, complete inhibition of axillary meristem development, an expanded tunica domain and trichome formation on the SAM epidermis. CaHAM is expressed in the periphery of the SAM and in the vasculature of young leaves throughout plant development, reaching its highest level in the reproductive growth stage. Analysis of the effect of CaHAM loss-of-function on its own expression showed that CaHAM is negatively autoregulated. Furthermore, CaHAM negatively regulates the expression level and pattern of pepper SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (CaSTM), which is required to maintain the SAM in an undifferentiated state. We conclude that CaHAM is regulated to achieve adjusted functional levels and has a conserved role in controlling SAM maintenance, organization and axillary meristem formation. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
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