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Utama, I.M.S., Study Program of Agricultural Technology, Udayana University, Bukit Jimbaran Campus, Badung, Bali, Indonesia
Wills, R.B.H., Department of Food Technology, Newcastle University, Central Coast Campus, P.O. Box 127, Ourimbah, NSW, Australia
Ben-Yehoshua, S., Agricultural Research Organization, Volcanic Center, Bet-Dagan, Israel
Kuek, C., Faculty of Business and Technology, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
The effects of acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, ethanol, benzyl alcohol, nerolidol, 2-nonanone, β-ionone, and ethyl formate vapors on the growth of Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicillium digitatum, Colletotrichum musae, Erwinia carotovora, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar medium were evaluated. The aldehydes were found to be the strongest growth inhibitors and the most lethal to the fungal spores and mycelia and bacterial cells. The average minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aldehydes that were germicidal to decay microorganisms were 0.28, 0.49, and 0.88 mmol per Petri dish, for cinnamaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and acetaldehyde, respectively. Ethanol also inhibited growth completely, but the MIC, which was 14.6 mmol per Petri dish, was significantly higher than those of the aldehydes. Ethanol can be considered germistatic because the alcohol does not inhibit germination of spores completely; it completely controlled only mycelial growth. The ketones tended to be effective only on P. digitatum and C. musae, whereas ethyl formate was not effective except on P. digitatum. The concentration of a volatile compound in the headspace of the Petri dish and its diffusion into the medium largely determined its efficacy against decay microorganisms.
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In vitro efficacy of plant volatiles for inhibiting the growth of fruit and vegetable decay microorganisms
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Utama, I.M.S., Study Program of Agricultural Technology, Udayana University, Bukit Jimbaran Campus, Badung, Bali, Indonesia
Wills, R.B.H., Department of Food Technology, Newcastle University, Central Coast Campus, P.O. Box 127, Ourimbah, NSW, Australia
Ben-Yehoshua, S., Agricultural Research Organization, Volcanic Center, Bet-Dagan, Israel
Kuek, C., Faculty of Business and Technology, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
In vitro efficacy of plant volatiles for inhibiting the growth of fruit and vegetable decay microorganisms
The effects of acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, ethanol, benzyl alcohol, nerolidol, 2-nonanone, β-ionone, and ethyl formate vapors on the growth of Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicillium digitatum, Colletotrichum musae, Erwinia carotovora, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar medium were evaluated. The aldehydes were found to be the strongest growth inhibitors and the most lethal to the fungal spores and mycelia and bacterial cells. The average minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aldehydes that were germicidal to decay microorganisms were 0.28, 0.49, and 0.88 mmol per Petri dish, for cinnamaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and acetaldehyde, respectively. Ethanol also inhibited growth completely, but the MIC, which was 14.6 mmol per Petri dish, was significantly higher than those of the aldehydes. Ethanol can be considered germistatic because the alcohol does not inhibit germination of spores completely; it completely controlled only mycelial growth. The ketones tended to be effective only on P. digitatum and C. musae, whereas ethyl formate was not effective except on P. digitatum. The concentration of a volatile compound in the headspace of the Petri dish and its diffusion into the medium largely determined its efficacy against decay microorganisms.
Scientific Publication
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