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Hovav, R., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Badani, H., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Ginzberg, I., Department of Vegetable Crops and Genetics, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Chedvat, I., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Brand, Y., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Galili, S., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
In the in-shell peanut market, consumers favour the bright yellow shells characteristic of peanuts grown in sandy soils. Expanding cultivation of commercial varieties into areas with heavier soils has led to a less desirable brown tint, and reduced crop marketability. To overcome this, we evaluated a collection of 97 genotypes for shell colour when grown in sandy or semi-red soils to identify genotypes that have bright shells when grown in heavier soils. Residual maximum likelihood analyses of spectrophotometer-based parameters indicated significant genotype×soil interaction effects for all of the examined colour variables: brightness, red and yellow. In the heavier soil, there was also a significant correlation between maturity and the red variable. The pods of several early-maturing genotypes, mainly from the fastigiata group, had similar or better scores in the heavier soil than in the sandy soil. We did not observe any significant correlations between colour variables and other important pod traits, aside from maturity and shell thickness, highlighting the potential for introducing desirable pod colour into local cultivars to be grown in heavy soils. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.
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Evaluation of a peanut collection for shell-colour traits in two diverse soil types
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Hovav, R., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Badani, H., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Ginzberg, I., Department of Vegetable Crops and Genetics, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Chedvat, I., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Brand, Y., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Galili, S., Department of Field Crops, Plant Science Institute, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Evaluation of a peanut collection for shell-colour traits in two diverse soil types
In the in-shell peanut market, consumers favour the bright yellow shells characteristic of peanuts grown in sandy soils. Expanding cultivation of commercial varieties into areas with heavier soils has led to a less desirable brown tint, and reduced crop marketability. To overcome this, we evaluated a collection of 97 genotypes for shell colour when grown in sandy or semi-red soils to identify genotypes that have bright shells when grown in heavier soils. Residual maximum likelihood analyses of spectrophotometer-based parameters indicated significant genotype×soil interaction effects for all of the examined colour variables: brightness, red and yellow. In the heavier soil, there was also a significant correlation between maturity and the red variable. The pods of several early-maturing genotypes, mainly from the fastigiata group, had similar or better scores in the heavier soil than in the sandy soil. We did not observe any significant correlations between colour variables and other important pod traits, aside from maturity and shell thickness, highlighting the potential for introducing desirable pod colour into local cultivars to be grown in heavy soils. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.
Scientific Publication
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