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Horticultural characteristics of licorice waste compost
Year:
2011
Source of publication :
Compost Science and Utilization
Authors :
Krasnovsky, Arkady
;
.
Medina, Shlomit
;
.
Raviv, Michael
;
.
Yogev, Anat
;
.
Volume :
19
Co-Authors:
Medina, S., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Krassnovsky, A., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Yogev, A., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Raviv, M., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
163
To page:
169
(
Total pages:
7
)
Abstract:
Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) is a leguminous herbaceous perennial. Its root extracts are commonly used for medicinal uses and as a flavoring agent in the food and tobacco industries. After extraction, about 10,000 tones of licorice root residues are accumulated in Israel annually with no recycling outlet. The objectives of the current research were to develop a reliable protocol for licorice root wastes composting, to test the use of licorice compost as a peat substitute in growing media and to study its suppressiveness against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM) - the causal agent of Fusarium wilt of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Licorice root wastes were cocomposted using temperature controlled forced aeration with the coarse fraction of separated cow manure, in order to enrich both its nutrients content and microbial population. Thermophilic conditions prevailed in the pile for 90 days and the compost stabilized and reached ambient temperature 110 days from start. The physical characteristics of the resulted compost were comparable to that of peat. Nutrient content was high and salinity was relatively low. No phytotoxicity was found in the compost extract, based on the cress germination test. Tomato plants grown in compost showed enhanced development as compared to peat. The number of surviving FOM spores incubated in the compost declined faster then in peat. Fusarium infested melon plants survived much better if planted in the licorice compost, as compared to peat. It is concluded that licorice compost can serve as a peat substitute with preferable qualities.
Note:
Related Files :
Cucumis melo
Fusarium
Fusarium wilt
germination
growing media
horticulture
Melon plant
Nutrients
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More details
DOI :
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
28585
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:40
Scientific Publication
Horticultural characteristics of licorice waste compost
19
Medina, S., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Krassnovsky, A., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Yogev, A., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Raviv, M., Agricultural Research Organization, Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay, Israel
Horticultural characteristics of licorice waste compost
Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) is a leguminous herbaceous perennial. Its root extracts are commonly used for medicinal uses and as a flavoring agent in the food and tobacco industries. After extraction, about 10,000 tones of licorice root residues are accumulated in Israel annually with no recycling outlet. The objectives of the current research were to develop a reliable protocol for licorice root wastes composting, to test the use of licorice compost as a peat substitute in growing media and to study its suppressiveness against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM) - the causal agent of Fusarium wilt of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Licorice root wastes were cocomposted using temperature controlled forced aeration with the coarse fraction of separated cow manure, in order to enrich both its nutrients content and microbial population. Thermophilic conditions prevailed in the pile for 90 days and the compost stabilized and reached ambient temperature 110 days from start. The physical characteristics of the resulted compost were comparable to that of peat. Nutrient content was high and salinity was relatively low. No phytotoxicity was found in the compost extract, based on the cress germination test. Tomato plants grown in compost showed enhanced development as compared to peat. The number of surviving FOM spores incubated in the compost declined faster then in peat. Fusarium infested melon plants survived much better if planted in the licorice compost, as compared to peat. It is concluded that licorice compost can serve as a peat substitute with preferable qualities.
Scientific Publication
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