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Gas exchange and metabolite fluctuations in green and yellow bands of variegated leaves of the monocotyledonous CAM species Agave americana
Year:
1998
Source of publication :
Physiologia Plantarum
Authors :
Raveh, Eran
;
.
Volume :
103
Co-Authors:
Raveh, E., Dept of Biology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, United States
Wang, N., Dept of Biology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, United States
Nobel, P.S., Dept of Biology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
99
To page:
106
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
The variegated leaves of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Agave americana have a large central longitudinal green band with narrow yellow bands on either side. The yellow bands had 97% less pigment content, 84% lower ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity, but only 20% lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity than the green band. The green bands exhibited gas exchange typical of CAM plants, with most CO 2 uptake occurring at night, leading to a daily net CO 2 uptake of 127 mmol m -2 day -1. The yellow bands had some nighttime net CO 2 uptake but a larger loss during the daytime, indicating that they were sink tissues. Nocturnal citrate and malate accumulations for the yellow bands were 65 and 75%, respectively, of those of the green bands; sucrose supported 64-83% of their nocturnal acid accumulation. This is the first evidence that agaves, which are malic-enzyme-type CAM plants, use sucrose as the carbon source for nocturnal acid accumulation. About 44% of the carbon demand of the yellow bands can be supplied by sucrose diffusing via the symplast from the adjacent green band, about 25% from fructose and glucose diffusion, and some via the apoplast.
Note:
Related Files :
Achlorophyllous
Agave americana
Apoplast
malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating)
photosynthesis
Sink-source relation
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1034/j.1399-3054.1998.1030112.x
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
28806
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:42
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Scientific Publication
Gas exchange and metabolite fluctuations in green and yellow bands of variegated leaves of the monocotyledonous CAM species Agave americana
103
Raveh, E., Dept of Biology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, United States
Wang, N., Dept of Biology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, United States
Nobel, P.S., Dept of Biology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, United States
Gas exchange and metabolite fluctuations in green and yellow bands of variegated leaves of the monocotyledonous CAM species Agave americana
The variegated leaves of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Agave americana have a large central longitudinal green band with narrow yellow bands on either side. The yellow bands had 97% less pigment content, 84% lower ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity, but only 20% lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity than the green band. The green bands exhibited gas exchange typical of CAM plants, with most CO 2 uptake occurring at night, leading to a daily net CO 2 uptake of 127 mmol m -2 day -1. The yellow bands had some nighttime net CO 2 uptake but a larger loss during the daytime, indicating that they were sink tissues. Nocturnal citrate and malate accumulations for the yellow bands were 65 and 75%, respectively, of those of the green bands; sucrose supported 64-83% of their nocturnal acid accumulation. This is the first evidence that agaves, which are malic-enzyme-type CAM plants, use sucrose as the carbon source for nocturnal acid accumulation. About 44% of the carbon demand of the yellow bands can be supplied by sucrose diffusing via the symplast from the adjacent green band, about 25% from fructose and glucose diffusion, and some via the apoplast.
Scientific Publication
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