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Grapevine petioles are more sensitive to drought induced embolism than stems: evidence from in vivo MRI and microcomputed tomography observations of hydraulic vulnerability segmentation
Year:
2016
Source of publication :
Plant, Cell and Environment
Authors :
David-Schwartz, Rakefet
;
.
Volume :
39
Co-Authors:
Hochberg, U., Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie e Ambientali, University of Udine, Udine, Italy, INRA, UMR 547 PIAF/Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Albuquerque, C., Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, CA, United States
Rachmilevitch, S., The Jacob Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be'er Sheva, Israel
Cochard, H., INRA, UMR 547 PIAF/Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France
David-Schwartz, R., Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Centre, Bet Dagan, Israel
Brodersen, C.R., School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
McElrone, A., Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, CA, United States, Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Davis, CA, United States
Windt, C.W., Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute for Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Jülich, Germany
Facilitators :
From page:
1886
To page:
1894
(
Total pages:
9
)
Abstract:
The ‘hydraulic vulnerability segmentation’ hypothesis predicts that expendable distal organs are more susceptible to water stress-induced embolism than the main stem of the plant. In the current work, we present the first in vivo visualization of this phenomenon. In two separate experiments, using magnetic resonance imaging or synchrotron-based microcomputed tomography, grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were dehydrated while simultaneously scanning the main stems and petioles for the occurrence of emboli at different xylem pressures (Ψx). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that 50% of the conductive xylem area of the petioles was embolized at a Ψx of −1.54 MPa, whereas the stems did not reach similar losses until −1.9 MPa. Microcomputed tomography confirmed these findings, showing that approximately half the vessels in the petioles were embolized at a Ψx of −1.6 MPa, whereas only few were embolized in the stems. Petioles were shown to be more resistant to water stress-induced embolism than previously measured with invasive hydraulic methods. The results provide the first direct evidence for the hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis and highlight its importance in grapevine responses to severe water stress. Additionally, these data suggest that air entry through the petiole into the stem is unlikely in grapevines during drought. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Note:
Related Files :
cavitation
Hydraulic conductance
Vitis
Vitis vinifera
vulnerability curves
xylem
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1111/pce.12688
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
28828
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:42
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Grapevine petioles are more sensitive to drought induced embolism than stems: evidence from in vivo MRI and microcomputed tomography observations of hydraulic vulnerability segmentation
39
Hochberg, U., Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie e Ambientali, University of Udine, Udine, Italy, INRA, UMR 547 PIAF/Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Albuquerque, C., Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, CA, United States
Rachmilevitch, S., The Jacob Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be'er Sheva, Israel
Cochard, H., INRA, UMR 547 PIAF/Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France
David-Schwartz, R., Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Centre, Bet Dagan, Israel
Brodersen, C.R., School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
McElrone, A., Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, CA, United States, Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Davis, CA, United States
Windt, C.W., Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute for Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Jülich, Germany
Grapevine petioles are more sensitive to drought induced embolism than stems: evidence from in vivo MRI and microcomputed tomography observations of hydraulic vulnerability segmentation
The ‘hydraulic vulnerability segmentation’ hypothesis predicts that expendable distal organs are more susceptible to water stress-induced embolism than the main stem of the plant. In the current work, we present the first in vivo visualization of this phenomenon. In two separate experiments, using magnetic resonance imaging or synchrotron-based microcomputed tomography, grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were dehydrated while simultaneously scanning the main stems and petioles for the occurrence of emboli at different xylem pressures (Ψx). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that 50% of the conductive xylem area of the petioles was embolized at a Ψx of −1.54 MPa, whereas the stems did not reach similar losses until −1.9 MPa. Microcomputed tomography confirmed these findings, showing that approximately half the vessels in the petioles were embolized at a Ψx of −1.6 MPa, whereas only few were embolized in the stems. Petioles were shown to be more resistant to water stress-induced embolism than previously measured with invasive hydraulic methods. The results provide the first direct evidence for the hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis and highlight its importance in grapevine responses to severe water stress. Additionally, these data suggest that air entry through the petiole into the stem is unlikely in grapevines during drought. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Scientific Publication
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