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Curcuma alismatifolia. I. Plant morphology and the effect of tuberous root number on flowering date and yield of inflorescences
Year:
1997
Source of publication :
Acta Horticulturae
Authors :
Hagiladi, Amir
;
.
Umiel, Nakdimon
;
.
Volume :
430
Co-Authors:
Hagiladi, A., Dept of Ornamental Horticulture, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Umiel, N., Dept of Ornamental Horticulture, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Gilad, Z., Jordan Valley Experimental Station, R and D, Mobil Post, Jordan-Valley-Jericho 90674, Israel
Yang, X.-H., Dept. of Ornamental Horticulture, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agri. Sciences, 30 Bai Shiqiao Road, Beijing 100081, China
Facilitators :
From page:
747
To page:
753
(
Total pages:
7
)
Abstract:
Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae) is a relatively new cut flower crop that is becoming a favorite on the international market. In addition to its attractive aerial part, it has unique geophylic parts consisting of a rhizome and several tuberous egg-shaped root ends (t-roots). The t-roots make up about 85% of the total fresh weight and 70% of the total dry weight of a typical propagule (one rhizome + 5-6 t-roots). In this study we determined the relationship between the number of t-roots per propagule, flowering date and yield of inflorescences. The experiments were conducted in greenhouses in the Jordan and Jezreel Valleys in Israel, from March 20 to October 26, 1993. Propagules bearing 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 t-roots were planted in Styrofoam trays containing a mixture of peatmoss and volcanic tuff (7/3, v/v). In the Jezreel Valley, propagules bearing fewer than 2 t-roots flowered later than those with 2 or more t-roots. There were no significant differences in the number of days from planting to flowering among plants originating from propagules with 2-5 t-roots. Both the scape length and number of inflorescences per plant were correlated with the number of t-roots on the propagule. Similar results were obtained in the Jordan Valley, with the exception that plants started flowering about 40 days earlier than those in the Jezreel Valley, possibly due to higher prevailing temperatures.
Note:
Related Files :
Curcuma
Curcuma alismatifolia
cut flower
geophyte
morphology
rhizome
Zingiberaceae
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DOI :
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
Conference paper
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
29061
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:44
Scientific Publication
Curcuma alismatifolia. I. Plant morphology and the effect of tuberous root number on flowering date and yield of inflorescences
430
Hagiladi, A., Dept of Ornamental Horticulture, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Umiel, N., Dept of Ornamental Horticulture, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Gilad, Z., Jordan Valley Experimental Station, R and D, Mobil Post, Jordan-Valley-Jericho 90674, Israel
Yang, X.-H., Dept. of Ornamental Horticulture, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agri. Sciences, 30 Bai Shiqiao Road, Beijing 100081, China
Curcuma alismatifolia. I. Plant morphology and the effect of tuberous root number on flowering date and yield of inflorescences
Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae) is a relatively new cut flower crop that is becoming a favorite on the international market. In addition to its attractive aerial part, it has unique geophylic parts consisting of a rhizome and several tuberous egg-shaped root ends (t-roots). The t-roots make up about 85% of the total fresh weight and 70% of the total dry weight of a typical propagule (one rhizome + 5-6 t-roots). In this study we determined the relationship between the number of t-roots per propagule, flowering date and yield of inflorescences. The experiments were conducted in greenhouses in the Jordan and Jezreel Valleys in Israel, from March 20 to October 26, 1993. Propagules bearing 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 t-roots were planted in Styrofoam trays containing a mixture of peatmoss and volcanic tuff (7/3, v/v). In the Jezreel Valley, propagules bearing fewer than 2 t-roots flowered later than those with 2 or more t-roots. There were no significant differences in the number of days from planting to flowering among plants originating from propagules with 2-5 t-roots. Both the scape length and number of inflorescences per plant were correlated with the number of t-roots on the propagule. Similar results were obtained in the Jordan Valley, with the exception that plants started flowering about 40 days earlier than those in the Jezreel Valley, possibly due to higher prevailing temperatures.
Scientific Publication
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