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Meiering, A.G., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Courtin, M.G., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Spoelstra, S.F., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Pahlow, G., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Honig, H., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Subden, R.E., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Zimmer, E., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
The effect of dry matter concentration and nitrogen fertilizer applications on the microbial fermentation pattern and toxic gas production in grass silages was investigated in a series of field plot and laboratory experiments. The growth kinetics and clostridia, enterobacteria, lactobacilli and yeasts, their substrate consumption and metabolite production was defined in a simulation model. Numerical methods were used to predict the reaction rates of the fermentation process such as acidification, pH development and the production of carbon dioxide and nutrous gases for a variety of input conditions. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical data indicated that the simulation model may be used to improve guidelines for silo safety and to analyze the effects of inocula and chemical additives on silages quality.The effect of dry matter concentration and nitrogen fertilizer applications on the microbial fermentation pattern and toxic gas production in grass silages was investigated in a series of field plot and laboratory experiments. The growth kinetics of clostridia, enterobacteria, lactobacilli and yeasts, their substrate consumption and metabolite production was defined in a simulation model. Numerical methods were used to predict the reaction rates of the fermentation process such as acidification, pH development and the production of carbon dioxide and nitrous gases for a variety of input conditions. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical data indicated that the simulation model may be used to improve guidelines for silo safety and to analyze the effects of inocula and chemical additives on silages quality.
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Fermentation kinetics and toxic gas production of silages
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Meiering, A.G., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Courtin, M.G., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Spoelstra, S.F., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Pahlow, G., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Honig, H., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Subden, R.E., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Zimmer, E., School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada
Fermentation kinetics and toxic gas production of silages
The effect of dry matter concentration and nitrogen fertilizer applications on the microbial fermentation pattern and toxic gas production in grass silages was investigated in a series of field plot and laboratory experiments. The growth kinetics and clostridia, enterobacteria, lactobacilli and yeasts, their substrate consumption and metabolite production was defined in a simulation model. Numerical methods were used to predict the reaction rates of the fermentation process such as acidification, pH development and the production of carbon dioxide and nutrous gases for a variety of input conditions. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical data indicated that the simulation model may be used to improve guidelines for silo safety and to analyze the effects of inocula and chemical additives on silages quality.The effect of dry matter concentration and nitrogen fertilizer applications on the microbial fermentation pattern and toxic gas production in grass silages was investigated in a series of field plot and laboratory experiments. The growth kinetics of clostridia, enterobacteria, lactobacilli and yeasts, their substrate consumption and metabolite production was defined in a simulation model. Numerical methods were used to predict the reaction rates of the fermentation process such as acidification, pH development and the production of carbon dioxide and nitrous gases for a variety of input conditions. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical data indicated that the simulation model may be used to improve guidelines for silo safety and to analyze the effects of inocula and chemical additives on silages quality.
Scientific Publication
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