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Heat Treatment Temporarily Inhibits Aroma Volatile Compound Emission from Golden Delicious Apples
Year:
1997
Authors :
Fallik, Elazar
;
.
Volume :
45
Co-Authors:
Fallik, E., ARO-The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Archbold, D.D., Dept. of Hort. and Landscape Arch., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, United States
Hamilton-Kemp, T.R., Dept. of Hort. and Landscape Arch., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, United States
Loughrin, J.H., Community Research Service, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY 40601, United States
Collins, R.W., Dept. of Hort. and Landscape Arch., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
4038
To page:
4041
(
Total pages:
4
)
Abstract:
Volatile compounds were collected by porous polymer trapping from Golden Delicious apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) that had been heat-treated for 4 days at 38 °C, a treatment developed to reduce physiological and pathological disorders during storage, and then stored at 1 °C. Heat treatment of apple fruits markedly inhibited emission of total volatile esters (compounds commonly associated with apple aroma) and total volatiles (comprised principally of the volatile esters and α-farnesene) of apple within 1 day of treatment. However, after an extended refrigerated storage at 1 °C, the heat-treated fruit recovered and produced more total volatiles, increasing from 4% compared to non-heat-treated fruit directly after heat treatment to 145% of non-heat-treated fruit after 6 weeks of storage. Total volatile production of non-heat-treated fruit declined over 5-fold during the 6 weeks of cold storage, while that of heat-treated fruit increased over 6-fold. Total volatile esters from heat-treated fruit declined after 1 week of storage but had increased 4-fold from the initial sampling date after 6 weeks of storage. The heat treatment effect on emission of volatile compounds was observed immediately following heat treatment. The fruit cuticle and epidermis were not barriers to volatile emission by heat-treated fruit since slicing both heat-treated and non-heat-treated fruit after treatment resulted in total volatile yields similar to intact fruit. Heat treatment apparently temporarily inhibited but did not destroy, or destroyed but allowed resynthesis of, the enzyme systems catalyzing volatile compound synthesis as shown by increasing emission over time by heat-treated apples.
Note:
Related Files :
Esters
Flavor
GOLDEN DELICIOUS
Malus domestica
Malus sylvestris
odors
Postharvest storage
taste
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
29346
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:46
Scientific Publication
Heat Treatment Temporarily Inhibits Aroma Volatile Compound Emission from Golden Delicious Apples
45
Fallik, E., ARO-The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Archbold, D.D., Dept. of Hort. and Landscape Arch., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, United States
Hamilton-Kemp, T.R., Dept. of Hort. and Landscape Arch., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, United States
Loughrin, J.H., Community Research Service, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY 40601, United States
Collins, R.W., Dept. of Hort. and Landscape Arch., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, United States
Heat Treatment Temporarily Inhibits Aroma Volatile Compound Emission from Golden Delicious Apples
Volatile compounds were collected by porous polymer trapping from Golden Delicious apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) that had been heat-treated for 4 days at 38 °C, a treatment developed to reduce physiological and pathological disorders during storage, and then stored at 1 °C. Heat treatment of apple fruits markedly inhibited emission of total volatile esters (compounds commonly associated with apple aroma) and total volatiles (comprised principally of the volatile esters and α-farnesene) of apple within 1 day of treatment. However, after an extended refrigerated storage at 1 °C, the heat-treated fruit recovered and produced more total volatiles, increasing from 4% compared to non-heat-treated fruit directly after heat treatment to 145% of non-heat-treated fruit after 6 weeks of storage. Total volatile production of non-heat-treated fruit declined over 5-fold during the 6 weeks of cold storage, while that of heat-treated fruit increased over 6-fold. Total volatile esters from heat-treated fruit declined after 1 week of storage but had increased 4-fold from the initial sampling date after 6 weeks of storage. The heat treatment effect on emission of volatile compounds was observed immediately following heat treatment. The fruit cuticle and epidermis were not barriers to volatile emission by heat-treated fruit since slicing both heat-treated and non-heat-treated fruit after treatment resulted in total volatile yields similar to intact fruit. Heat treatment apparently temporarily inhibited but did not destroy, or destroyed but allowed resynthesis of, the enzyme systems catalyzing volatile compound synthesis as shown by increasing emission over time by heat-treated apples.
Scientific Publication
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