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Incorporation of intraguild predation into a pest management decision-making tool: The case of thrips and two pollen-feeding predators in Strawberry
Year:
2010
Source of publication :
Journal of Economic Entomology
Authors :
Weintraub, Phyllis
;
.
Volume :
103
Co-Authors:
Shakya, S., Department of Entomology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Himalayan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology (HICAST), Purbanchal University, P.O. Box 13233, Kathmandu, Nepal
Coll, M., Department of Entomology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Weintraub, P.G.
Facilitators :
From page:
1086
To page:
1093
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
Action thresholds are traditionally based on the density of pests and the economic damage they cause to crops. Pest damage assessments are usually made in a "sterile" environment, devoid of extenuating factors such as predators, parasitoids, and alternative food sources. Recently, the effects of a predator or parasitoid species have been considered. However, interactions between natural enemy species (intraguild predation and interference), which are common in agricultural fields, have not been incorporated yet into decision-making tools. We conducted a series of leaf disc and potted plant trials to evaluate the effects of two predator species, the anthocorid Orius laevigatus (Fieber) and the phytoseiid Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) on the density of and fruit damage inflicted by western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). We then used the obtained results to develop a pest management decision-making tool for the control of western flower thrips. Because strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne) flower in cycles, pollen, a food source for both predators and the pest, is periodically available in the system and has also been incorporated in our decision-making tool. The developed new management tool would allow the relaxation of the economic threshold (ET) for western flower thrips in strawberry flowers. The presence of an average of a single O. laevigatus per flower for example, may allow that relaxation of the ET by 40% (from 10 to 14 western flower thrips per flower) when pollen is available during the winter. Because field monitoring shows that O. laevigatus populations in Israeli strawberry often reach mean densities of three to four per flower, the new approach promises to drastically reduce the employment of toxic insecticides. © 2010 Entomological Society of America.
Note:
Related Files :
Animal
Animals
Fragaria
insects
Intraguild predation
Parasitology
pollen (external)
predation
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1603/EC09373
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
29446
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:47
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Incorporation of intraguild predation into a pest management decision-making tool: The case of thrips and two pollen-feeding predators in Strawberry
103
Shakya, S., Department of Entomology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Himalayan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology (HICAST), Purbanchal University, P.O. Box 13233, Kathmandu, Nepal
Coll, M., Department of Entomology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Weintraub, P.G.
Incorporation of intraguild predation into a pest management decision-making tool: The case of thrips and two pollen-feeding predators in Strawberry
Action thresholds are traditionally based on the density of pests and the economic damage they cause to crops. Pest damage assessments are usually made in a "sterile" environment, devoid of extenuating factors such as predators, parasitoids, and alternative food sources. Recently, the effects of a predator or parasitoid species have been considered. However, interactions between natural enemy species (intraguild predation and interference), which are common in agricultural fields, have not been incorporated yet into decision-making tools. We conducted a series of leaf disc and potted plant trials to evaluate the effects of two predator species, the anthocorid Orius laevigatus (Fieber) and the phytoseiid Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) on the density of and fruit damage inflicted by western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). We then used the obtained results to develop a pest management decision-making tool for the control of western flower thrips. Because strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne) flower in cycles, pollen, a food source for both predators and the pest, is periodically available in the system and has also been incorporated in our decision-making tool. The developed new management tool would allow the relaxation of the economic threshold (ET) for western flower thrips in strawberry flowers. The presence of an average of a single O. laevigatus per flower for example, may allow that relaxation of the ET by 40% (from 10 to 14 western flower thrips per flower) when pollen is available during the winter. Because field monitoring shows that O. laevigatus populations in Israeli strawberry often reach mean densities of three to four per flower, the new approach promises to drastically reduce the employment of toxic insecticides. © 2010 Entomological Society of America.
Scientific Publication
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