Advanced Search
Syntax
Search...
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Manage
Community:
אסיף מאגר המחקר החקלאי
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Negative wien effect measurements for exploring polarization processes of cations interacting with negatively charged soil particles
Year:
2009
Authors :
Friedman, Samuel
;
.
Volume :
73
Co-Authors:
Wang, Y.-J., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Li, C.-B., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Wang, W., College of Resource and Environ., Science Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Jiang, J., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Zhou, D.-M., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Xu, R., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Friedman, S.P., Institute of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sci. Agric., Research Organization, Volcani Center Bet, Dagan 50250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
569
To page:
578
(
Total pages:
10
)
Abstract:
The Wien effect, that is, the dependence of the electrical conductivity of dilute suspensions of soil particles on electrical field strength, was explored in the intermediate field-strengths range of 0.9 × 106 to 5 × 106 V m-1, at higher resolution than in previous studies. This enabled the detection of a local minimum in the electrical conductivity-field strength relationship in which the declining phase is termed the negative Wien effect. Suspensions of clay-size soil particles of three soil types, with various mono-, di-, and trivalent cations, were tested. A negative Wien effect was observed with homoionic soil particles saturated with divalent cations, with electrodialyzed soil particles, and with suspensions of black soil particles that contained organic matter. Two quantifiers of the declining and increasing slopes: (i) polarizability (counter ion polarization and re-adsorption); (ii) ion-stripping intensity-on the respective sides of the local minimum were used for characterizing the interaction between the soil particles and the counter ions. The higher mean ion-stripping intensities found for the Na+ suspensions - twice those for the K+ suspensions - reflect the easier stripping off of the Na cations and the stronger adsorption of the K cations. The mean ion-stripping intensities of all divalent cations for the three soils were lower than those determined for the monovalent ones, which reflects the tighter binding of the divalent cations. The Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions were stripped off most easily from the surfaces of soil particles, and tighter binding was found for Pb2+ to brown soil and black soil, and for Cd2+ to yellow-brown soil. In general, lower polarizabilities were correlated with higher ion-stripping intensities (e.g., for Ca2+ and Zn2+). However, the exceptions (e.g., the polarizabilities of Cu2+ and Pb2+) shed more light on the interaction between the soil particles and the cations. The proposed method of characterization is superior to other methods for characterizing soil particle-counter ion interactions because it characterizes adsorption directly and not via exchange measurement, and it is less laborious than, for example, exchange isotherm measurements. © Soil Science Society of America.
Note:
Related Files :
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.2136/sssaj2008.0018
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
29450
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:47
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Negative wien effect measurements for exploring polarization processes of cations interacting with negatively charged soil particles
73
Wang, Y.-J., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Li, C.-B., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Wang, W., College of Resource and Environ., Science Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Jiang, J., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Zhou, D.-M., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Xu, R., State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agric., Institute of Soil Science Chinese, Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, China
Friedman, S.P., Institute of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sci. Agric., Research Organization, Volcani Center Bet, Dagan 50250, Israel
Negative wien effect measurements for exploring polarization processes of cations interacting with negatively charged soil particles
The Wien effect, that is, the dependence of the electrical conductivity of dilute suspensions of soil particles on electrical field strength, was explored in the intermediate field-strengths range of 0.9 × 106 to 5 × 106 V m-1, at higher resolution than in previous studies. This enabled the detection of a local minimum in the electrical conductivity-field strength relationship in which the declining phase is termed the negative Wien effect. Suspensions of clay-size soil particles of three soil types, with various mono-, di-, and trivalent cations, were tested. A negative Wien effect was observed with homoionic soil particles saturated with divalent cations, with electrodialyzed soil particles, and with suspensions of black soil particles that contained organic matter. Two quantifiers of the declining and increasing slopes: (i) polarizability (counter ion polarization and re-adsorption); (ii) ion-stripping intensity-on the respective sides of the local minimum were used for characterizing the interaction between the soil particles and the counter ions. The higher mean ion-stripping intensities found for the Na+ suspensions - twice those for the K+ suspensions - reflect the easier stripping off of the Na cations and the stronger adsorption of the K cations. The mean ion-stripping intensities of all divalent cations for the three soils were lower than those determined for the monovalent ones, which reflects the tighter binding of the divalent cations. The Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions were stripped off most easily from the surfaces of soil particles, and tighter binding was found for Pb2+ to brown soil and black soil, and for Cd2+ to yellow-brown soil. In general, lower polarizabilities were correlated with higher ion-stripping intensities (e.g., for Ca2+ and Zn2+). However, the exceptions (e.g., the polarizabilities of Cu2+ and Pb2+) shed more light on the interaction between the soil particles and the cations. The proposed method of characterization is superior to other methods for characterizing soil particle-counter ion interactions because it characterizes adsorption directly and not via exchange measurement, and it is less laborious than, for example, exchange isotherm measurements. © Soil Science Society of America.
Scientific Publication
נגישות
menu