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Ben-Deniel, B., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, M. P. Negev 85280, Israel, Department of Life Sciences, Ben-Gurion University Israe, Be'er-Sheva, Israel
Bar-Zvi, D., Department of Life Sciences, Ben-Gurion University Israe, Be'er-Sheva, Israel
Johnson, D., Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164-6430, United States
Harding, R., Department of Plant Pathology, South Australian Research and Development Institute, GPO Box 397, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Hazanovsky, M., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, M. P. Negev 85280, Israel
Tsror, L., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, M. P. Negev 85280, Israel
Vegetative compatibility of 94 isolates of Colletotrichum coccodes from Australia originating from potato, soil, and a weed (Solanum esuriale) was tested using nitrate-nonutilizing (nit) mutants. Isolates distributed to six vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), five of them multimember (24.5, 23.4, 13.8, 12.8, and 7.5% distribution) and only one composed of two isolates (2.1%); 15.9% of them were not assigned to any of the VCGs. Aggressiveness of 51 isolates representing all six VCGs was tested by mature green tomato bioassay: isolates assigned to AUS-VCG-4 were the most aggressive and those in AUSVCG- 3 the least (P < 0.05). Isolates from warmer climates and lower latitudes were more aggressive (P < 0.05). In ad ition, we report for the first time complementations between isolates from Australia (AUS); North America (NA); and Israel, The Netherlands, Scotland, France, Germany (EU/I). Isolates assigned to AUS-VCG-4 anastomosed with isolates assigned to EU/I-VCG-7 and NA-VCG-5 (which also anastomosed with each other). Isolates assigned to EU/I-VCG-6 anastomosed with isolates assigned to NA-VCG-2 and isolates assigned to AUS-VCG-2 anastomosed with isolates assigned to EU/I-VCG-2. The linkage between subpopulations could result from the limited exchange of seed tubers among continents, or could be due to, for instance, gene flow, selection, or a limited number of polymorphic vegetative incompatibility genes. © 2010 The American Phytopathological Society.
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Vegetative compatibility groups in colletotrichum coccodes subpopulations from Australia and genetic links with subpopulations from Europe/Israel and North America
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Ben-Deniel, B., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, M. P. Negev 85280, Israel, Department of Life Sciences, Ben-Gurion University Israe, Be'er-Sheva, Israel
Bar-Zvi, D., Department of Life Sciences, Ben-Gurion University Israe, Be'er-Sheva, Israel
Johnson, D., Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164-6430, United States
Harding, R., Department of Plant Pathology, South Australian Research and Development Institute, GPO Box 397, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Hazanovsky, M., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, M. P. Negev 85280, Israel
Tsror, L., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, M. P. Negev 85280, Israel
Vegetative compatibility groups in colletotrichum coccodes subpopulations from Australia and genetic links with subpopulations from Europe/Israel and North America
Vegetative compatibility of 94 isolates of Colletotrichum coccodes from Australia originating from potato, soil, and a weed (Solanum esuriale) was tested using nitrate-nonutilizing (nit) mutants. Isolates distributed to six vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), five of them multimember (24.5, 23.4, 13.8, 12.8, and 7.5% distribution) and only one composed of two isolates (2.1%); 15.9% of them were not assigned to any of the VCGs. Aggressiveness of 51 isolates representing all six VCGs was tested by mature green tomato bioassay: isolates assigned to AUS-VCG-4 were the most aggressive and those in AUSVCG- 3 the least (P < 0.05). Isolates from warmer climates and lower latitudes were more aggressive (P < 0.05). In ad ition, we report for the first time complementations between isolates from Australia (AUS); North America (NA); and Israel, The Netherlands, Scotland, France, Germany (EU/I). Isolates assigned to AUS-VCG-4 anastomosed with isolates assigned to EU/I-VCG-7 and NA-VCG-5 (which also anastomosed with each other). Isolates assigned to EU/I-VCG-6 anastomosed with isolates assigned to NA-VCG-2 and isolates assigned to AUS-VCG-2 anastomosed with isolates assigned to EU/I-VCG-2. The linkage between subpopulations could result from the limited exchange of seed tubers among continents, or could be due to, for instance, gene flow, selection, or a limited number of polymorphic vegetative incompatibility genes. © 2010 The American Phytopathological Society.
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