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Eugenol and isoeugenol, characteristic aromatic constituents of spices, are biosynthesized via reduction of a coniferyl alcohol ester
Year:
2006
Authors :
Fridman, Eyal
;
.
Volume :
103
Co-Authors:
Koeduka, T., Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 North University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States
Fridman, E., Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 North University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States, Smith Institute for Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Gang, D.R., Department of Plant Sciences, Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, United States
Vassão, D.G., Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6340, United States
Jackson, B.L., Department of Plant Sciences, Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, United States
Kish, C.M., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Orlova, I., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Spassova, S.M., Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Jack H. Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, United States
Lewis, N.G., Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6340, United States
Noel, J.P., Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Jack H. Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, United States
Baiga, T.J., Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Jack H. Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, United States
Dudareva, N., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Pichersky, E., Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 North University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
10128
To page:
10133
(
Total pages:
6
)
Abstract:
Phenylpropenes such as chavicol, t-anol, eugenol, and isoeugenol are produced by plants as defense compounds against animals and microorganisms and as floral attractants of pollinators. Moreover, humans have used phenylpropenes since antiquity for food preservation and flavoring and as medicinal agents. Previous research suggested that the phenylpropenes are synthesized in plants from substituted phenylpropenols, although the identity of the enzymes and the nature of the reaction mechanism involved in this transformation have remained obscure. We show here that glandular trichomes of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum), which synthesize and accumulate phenylpropenes, possess an enzyme that can use coniferyl acetate and NADPH to form eugenol. Petunia (Petunia hybrida cv. Mitchell) flowers, which emit large amounts of isoeugenol, possess an enzyme homologous to the basil eugenol-forming enzyme that also uses coniferyl acetate and NADPH as substrates but catalyzes the formation of isoeugenol. The basil and petunia phenylpropene-forming enzymes belong to a structural family of NADPH-dependent reductases that also includes pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase, isoflavone reductase, and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase. © 2006 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Note:
Related Files :
aromatic compound
ester
Eugenol
food preservation
Ocimum basilicum
Petunia
phenols
plant growth
pollination
spices
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1073/pnas.0603732103
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
30400
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:54
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Scientific Publication
Eugenol and isoeugenol, characteristic aromatic constituents of spices, are biosynthesized via reduction of a coniferyl alcohol ester
103
Koeduka, T., Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 North University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States
Fridman, E., Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 North University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States, Smith Institute for Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Gang, D.R., Department of Plant Sciences, Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, United States
Vassão, D.G., Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6340, United States
Jackson, B.L., Department of Plant Sciences, Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, United States
Kish, C.M., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Orlova, I., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Spassova, S.M., Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Jack H. Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, United States
Lewis, N.G., Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6340, United States
Noel, J.P., Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Jack H. Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, United States
Baiga, T.J., Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Jack H. Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, United States
Dudareva, N., Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Pichersky, E., Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 North University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States
Eugenol and isoeugenol, characteristic aromatic constituents of spices, are biosynthesized via reduction of a coniferyl alcohol ester
Phenylpropenes such as chavicol, t-anol, eugenol, and isoeugenol are produced by plants as defense compounds against animals and microorganisms and as floral attractants of pollinators. Moreover, humans have used phenylpropenes since antiquity for food preservation and flavoring and as medicinal agents. Previous research suggested that the phenylpropenes are synthesized in plants from substituted phenylpropenols, although the identity of the enzymes and the nature of the reaction mechanism involved in this transformation have remained obscure. We show here that glandular trichomes of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum), which synthesize and accumulate phenylpropenes, possess an enzyme that can use coniferyl acetate and NADPH to form eugenol. Petunia (Petunia hybrida cv. Mitchell) flowers, which emit large amounts of isoeugenol, possess an enzyme homologous to the basil eugenol-forming enzyme that also uses coniferyl acetate and NADPH as substrates but catalyzes the formation of isoeugenol. The basil and petunia phenylpropene-forming enzymes belong to a structural family of NADPH-dependent reductases that also includes pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase, isoflavone reductase, and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase. © 2006 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Scientific Publication
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