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Phytoparasitica
Argov, Y., The Israel Cohen Institute for Biological Control, Citrus Marketing Board, Rehovot, Israel
Podoler, H., Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Bar-Shalom, O., Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Rosen, D., Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
A method was developed for mass rearing the Florida wax scale (FWS), Ceroplasta floridensis Comstock — an important pest of citrus and other fruit trees in the Mediterranean basin — for production of natural enemies. The effect of host plant species, intensity of illumination and scale insect density on survival and size of the FWS was studied. Myrtus communis was found to be the most efficient host plant, and the required intensity of illumination was 200 µmol m-2s-1(with a photoperiod of 12L: 12D). Under these conditions, a density of 500 scale insects per plant could be achieved without reducing the size of the FWS below that required for the development of natural enemies. © 1987, Springer Science + Business Media B.V.. All rights reserved.
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Mass rearing of the florida wax scale, Ceroplastes floridensis, for production of natural enemies
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Argov, Y., The Israel Cohen Institute for Biological Control, Citrus Marketing Board, Rehovot, Israel
Podoler, H., Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Bar-Shalom, O., Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Rosen, D., Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Mass rearing of the florida wax scale, Ceroplastes floridensis, for production of natural enemies
A method was developed for mass rearing the Florida wax scale (FWS), Ceroplasta floridensis Comstock — an important pest of citrus and other fruit trees in the Mediterranean basin — for production of natural enemies. The effect of host plant species, intensity of illumination and scale insect density on survival and size of the FWS was studied. Myrtus communis was found to be the most efficient host plant, and the required intensity of illumination was 200 µmol m-2s-1(with a photoperiod of 12L: 12D). Under these conditions, a density of 500 scale insects per plant could be achieved without reducing the size of the FWS below that required for the development of natural enemies. © 1987, Springer Science + Business Media B.V.. All rights reserved.
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