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Land-races of wheat from the northern Negev in Israel
Year:
1983
Source of publication :
Euphytica
Authors :
Poiarkova, Helena
;
.
Volume :
32
Co-Authors:
Poiarkova, H., The Volcani Center, ARO, POB 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Blum, A., The Volcani Center, ARO, POB 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
257
To page:
271
(
Total pages:
15
)
Abstract:
Wheat has traditionally been grown by the Beduin population in the semi-arid (150 to 200 mm, mean total annual rainfall) northern Negev region of Israel. A collection was made in this area (the size of which is 150 km2) from small (0.1 to 0.5ha) fields of mixed wheat, resulting in 1553 collected spikes. Each spike was planted in a 1 m row at Bet Dagan, and grown under favorable conditions. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from each row. Qualitative data were submitted to hierarchial clustering and the results were compared with published information on the identification, classification and distribution of the land-races of wheat in the Middle East. Triticum durum was represented in 84% of the collection. It was clustered into 22 populations, identified as 11 known varietas of T. durum. They were aggregated into five groups, similar to groups of old varieties recognized by Jacubziner (1932). While 38.5% of the collection consisted of T. durum groups villosa and sinaica, aboriginal to the northern Negev, it included also forms similar to several land-races found in the past in other parts of the Middle East. Each of the populations, and the durum collection as a whole, was very diverse for the quantitatively measured plant attributes. Triticum aestivum was represented in 15.6% of the collection, clustered into six populations. Most of the common wheat accessions were analogous to the old locally grown variety Hirbawi. Triticum compactum was represented in only eight accessions. The collection is now being evaluated as a potential genetic resource for durum wheat breeding. © 1983 H. Veenman En Zonen B.V.
Note:
Related Files :
bread wheat
collection
Durum wheat
germplasm
land-races
local varieties
Triticum aestivum
Triticum compactum
Triticum durum
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1007/BF00036886
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
30450
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:54
Scientific Publication
Land-races of wheat from the northern Negev in Israel
32
Poiarkova, H., The Volcani Center, ARO, POB 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Blum, A., The Volcani Center, ARO, POB 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Land-races of wheat from the northern Negev in Israel
Wheat has traditionally been grown by the Beduin population in the semi-arid (150 to 200 mm, mean total annual rainfall) northern Negev region of Israel. A collection was made in this area (the size of which is 150 km2) from small (0.1 to 0.5ha) fields of mixed wheat, resulting in 1553 collected spikes. Each spike was planted in a 1 m row at Bet Dagan, and grown under favorable conditions. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from each row. Qualitative data were submitted to hierarchial clustering and the results were compared with published information on the identification, classification and distribution of the land-races of wheat in the Middle East. Triticum durum was represented in 84% of the collection. It was clustered into 22 populations, identified as 11 known varietas of T. durum. They were aggregated into five groups, similar to groups of old varieties recognized by Jacubziner (1932). While 38.5% of the collection consisted of T. durum groups villosa and sinaica, aboriginal to the northern Negev, it included also forms similar to several land-races found in the past in other parts of the Middle East. Each of the populations, and the durum collection as a whole, was very diverse for the quantitatively measured plant attributes. Triticum aestivum was represented in 15.6% of the collection, clustered into six populations. Most of the common wheat accessions were analogous to the old locally grown variety Hirbawi. Triticum compactum was represented in only eight accessions. The collection is now being evaluated as a potential genetic resource for durum wheat breeding. © 1983 H. Veenman En Zonen B.V.
Scientific Publication
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