Advanced Search
Syntax
Search...
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Manage
Community:
אסיף מאגר המחקר החקלאי
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Effects of root pruning and N-NO3 solution concentration on nutrient uptake and transpiration of tomato plants
Year:
1994
Source of publication :
Scientia Horticulturae
Authors :
Bar-Tal, Asher
;
.
Feigin, Amos
;
.
Rylski, Irena
;
.
Volume :
58
Co-Authors:
Bar-Tal, A., Institute of Soils and Water, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Feigin, A., Institute of Soils and Water, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Rylski, I., Institute of Field and Garden Crops, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Pressman, E., Institute of Field and Garden Crops, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
77
To page:
90
(
Total pages:
14
)
Abstract:
Root pruning of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum cultivar F 121) grown in an aerohydroponic system in a greenhouse resulted in reduced dry matter production. Increasing the solution nitrate concentration failed to compensate for the pruned roots. The objective of the present manuscript was to study the combined effect of root volume and nitrate solution concentration on nitrogen (N) uptake and transpiration. Root pruning decreased the total N uptake per plant, but the rate of uptake per unit root weight was higher in the pruned roots. Analysis of plant organs showed that root pruning did not affect N content per unit dry matter. Increasing the solution nitrate concentration from 1.5 to 9.0 mM increased significantly the nitrate uptake of plants with pruned and intact roots. It seems, therefore, that the reduced dry matter production of plants with pruned roots was not caused by N deficiency. Weekly transpiration was also reduced by root pruning, but the transpiration rate per unit root volume increased after root pruning. The water-use efficiency of the plants was also reduced by root pruning. It was concluded that the reduction in dry matter production following root pruning was not caused by restriction of transpiration. © 1994.
Note:
Related Files :
Lycopersicon esculentum
Nitrate (NO3) concentration
Nitrogen (N) uptake rate
root pruning
Transpiration rate
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1016/0304-4238(94)90129-5
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
30560
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:55
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Effects of root pruning and N-NO3 solution concentration on nutrient uptake and transpiration of tomato plants
58
Bar-Tal, A., Institute of Soils and Water, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Feigin, A., Institute of Soils and Water, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Rylski, I., Institute of Field and Garden Crops, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Pressman, E., Institute of Field and Garden Crops, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Effects of root pruning and N-NO3 solution concentration on nutrient uptake and transpiration of tomato plants
Root pruning of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum cultivar F 121) grown in an aerohydroponic system in a greenhouse resulted in reduced dry matter production. Increasing the solution nitrate concentration failed to compensate for the pruned roots. The objective of the present manuscript was to study the combined effect of root volume and nitrate solution concentration on nitrogen (N) uptake and transpiration. Root pruning decreased the total N uptake per plant, but the rate of uptake per unit root weight was higher in the pruned roots. Analysis of plant organs showed that root pruning did not affect N content per unit dry matter. Increasing the solution nitrate concentration from 1.5 to 9.0 mM increased significantly the nitrate uptake of plants with pruned and intact roots. It seems, therefore, that the reduced dry matter production of plants with pruned roots was not caused by N deficiency. Weekly transpiration was also reduced by root pruning, but the transpiration rate per unit root volume increased after root pruning. The water-use efficiency of the plants was also reduced by root pruning. It was concluded that the reduction in dry matter production following root pruning was not caused by restriction of transpiration. © 1994.
Scientific Publication
נגישות
menu      
You may also be interested in