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Bhardwaj, A.K., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Shainberg, I., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Goldstein, D., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Warrington, D.N., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Levy, G.J., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Mixing superabsorbents, such as cross-linked polyacrylamides (PAM), with sandy soils may decrease water percolation rates and increase water availability to crops. Four polymers were evaluated for their effects on water retention and hydraulic conductivity (HC) in the presence of either tap or distilled water and within sand mixtures. Water retained by the absorbents alone (at low suction) ranged between 200 and 500 kg kg-1 of polymer; water retained by the polymers when mixed with sand ranged between 40 and 140 kg kg-1. Water retained per kilogram of polymer increased with an increase in polymer concentration in the sand while undergoing desorption, but absorbed water decreased with polymer concentration during sorption, indicating an effect of hysteresis and absorption kinetics in the water absorption process. Applying a hydraulic head of tap water initially caused a decrease in the HC, explained by the decrease in the volume of the soil-absorbents mixtures, followed by a steady increase in HC ascribed to drainage of water from the swollen polymer granules that led to an increase in the size of pores available for water flow. Leaching the soil-absorbent mixtures with distilled water, simulating rainwater, increased the volume of the mixtures (due to polymer swelling) and decreased their HC due to pore blockage by the swollen polymer grains. Better understanding of the interaction among absorbents, soil, and water quality may produce an efficient and economic technology for improving the water management of sandy soils. © Soil Science Society of America.
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Water retention and hydraulic conductivity of cross-linked polyacrylamides in sandy soils
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Bhardwaj, A.K., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Shainberg, I., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Goldstein, D., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Warrington, D.N., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Levy, G.J., Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50-250, Israel
Water retention and hydraulic conductivity of cross-linked polyacrylamides in sandy soils
Mixing superabsorbents, such as cross-linked polyacrylamides (PAM), with sandy soils may decrease water percolation rates and increase water availability to crops. Four polymers were evaluated for their effects on water retention and hydraulic conductivity (HC) in the presence of either tap or distilled water and within sand mixtures. Water retained by the absorbents alone (at low suction) ranged between 200 and 500 kg kg-1 of polymer; water retained by the polymers when mixed with sand ranged between 40 and 140 kg kg-1. Water retained per kilogram of polymer increased with an increase in polymer concentration in the sand while undergoing desorption, but absorbed water decreased with polymer concentration during sorption, indicating an effect of hysteresis and absorption kinetics in the water absorption process. Applying a hydraulic head of tap water initially caused a decrease in the HC, explained by the decrease in the volume of the soil-absorbents mixtures, followed by a steady increase in HC ascribed to drainage of water from the swollen polymer granules that led to an increase in the size of pores available for water flow. Leaching the soil-absorbent mixtures with distilled water, simulating rainwater, increased the volume of the mixtures (due to polymer swelling) and decreased their HC due to pore blockage by the swollen polymer grains. Better understanding of the interaction among absorbents, soil, and water quality may produce an efficient and economic technology for improving the water management of sandy soils. © Soil Science Society of America.
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