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Response of sunflowers to quantities of irrigation water, irrigation regimes and salinities in the water and soil
Year:
1999
Source of publication :
Journal of Crop Production
Authors :
Grava, Avraham
;
.
Plaut, Zvi
;
.
Volume :
2
Co-Authors:
Plaut, Z., Institute of Soils and Water ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Grava, A., Institute of Soils and Water ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
299
To page:
315
(
Total pages:
17
)
Abstract:
The production of sunflower grains for roasting was investigated in two soil types under different quantities of applied saline and non-saline irrigation water, different irrigation managements, soil salinity due to previous use of saline water or due to a raised water table. It was shown in one experiment, conducted in a loess type soil, that sunflowers extracted water at least to a soil depth of 120 cm, when the available water from the top layers was used up. The crop in this soil consumed all the available soil water from nearly the entire root zone, while in the clay soil limited water was consumed from deep layers, due to the high salinity and lack of aeration. No decrease in yield was found in the loess soil when 75% of the full amount of water (which was 0.8 of Class A pan evaporation rate) was applied. When only 50% was applied a significant decrease in yield was obtained. In contrast, in the clay soil even 75% of the full amount of water decreased the yield remarkably. Under dry-land conditions approximately 65% of maximum yield was found in the loess soil but only 45% in the clay soil. These differences are all attributed to a shallow active root system in the clay soil. Residual soil salinity from previously use of saline water had no effect on grain production in the loess soil, while saline irrigation water applied during the irrigation season decreased production, but only when water supply was not rate limiting. The combination of saline water and residual soil salinity had a marked effect on the decrease of grain yield under limited irrigation. In both soils a reduction in the amount of water applied per single irrigation and maintaining the entire irrigation period caused a significantly smaller decrease in yield than shortening the irrigation period and applying the full demand.
Note:
Related Files :
Clay soil
Grain yield
irrigation
Soil salinity
sunflower
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More details
DOI :
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
Review
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
30739
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:56
Scientific Publication
Response of sunflowers to quantities of irrigation water, irrigation regimes and salinities in the water and soil
2
Plaut, Z., Institute of Soils and Water ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Grava, A., Institute of Soils and Water ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Response of sunflowers to quantities of irrigation water, irrigation regimes and salinities in the water and soil
The production of sunflower grains for roasting was investigated in two soil types under different quantities of applied saline and non-saline irrigation water, different irrigation managements, soil salinity due to previous use of saline water or due to a raised water table. It was shown in one experiment, conducted in a loess type soil, that sunflowers extracted water at least to a soil depth of 120 cm, when the available water from the top layers was used up. The crop in this soil consumed all the available soil water from nearly the entire root zone, while in the clay soil limited water was consumed from deep layers, due to the high salinity and lack of aeration. No decrease in yield was found in the loess soil when 75% of the full amount of water (which was 0.8 of Class A pan evaporation rate) was applied. When only 50% was applied a significant decrease in yield was obtained. In contrast, in the clay soil even 75% of the full amount of water decreased the yield remarkably. Under dry-land conditions approximately 65% of maximum yield was found in the loess soil but only 45% in the clay soil. These differences are all attributed to a shallow active root system in the clay soil. Residual soil salinity from previously use of saline water had no effect on grain production in the loess soil, while saline irrigation water applied during the irrigation season decreased production, but only when water supply was not rate limiting. The combination of saline water and residual soil salinity had a marked effect on the decrease of grain yield under limited irrigation. In both soils a reduction in the amount of water applied per single irrigation and maintaining the entire irrigation period caused a significantly smaller decrease in yield than shortening the irrigation period and applying the full demand.
Scientific Publication
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