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The effect of biochar on plant diseases: what should we learn while designing biochar substrates?
Year:
2017
Authors :
Elad, Yigal
;
.
Frenkel, Omer
;
.
Graber, Ellen
;
.
Jaiswal, Amit K.
;
.
Lew, Beni
;
.
Volume :
25
Co-Authors:
Frenkel, O., Department of Plant Pathology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Jaiswal, A.K., Department of Plant Pathology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Elad, Y., Department of Plant Pathology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Lew, B., Soil Chemistry, Plant Nutrition and Microbiology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Kammann, C., Hochschule Geisenheim University, Geisenheim, Germany
Graber, E.R., Soil Chemistry, Plant Nutrition and Microbiology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
105
To page:
113
(
Total pages:
9
)
Abstract:
The increasing demand for soilless substrates and rising environmental concerns about the use of non-renewable resources such as peat has led to the search for alternative constituents of growing mixtures for containerized plants. In this report we reviewed the works concerning biochar as constituent of growing media, targeting its influence on plant growth and plant disease. Biochar mostly has positive or neutral influences on plant growth compared with peat media when present in concentrations higher than 25% (v:v). However, studies of biochar influence on plant disease reveals that while lower concentrations (≤1%) of biochar often suppressed several diseases, higher concentrations (≥3%) were mostly ineffective or induced plant disease. For use as horticultural peat replacement, it is recommended that biochar feedstocks and concentrations be standardized and the potential effect of biochar on plant disease be considered, so that growers can rely on consistent and reproducible biochars for desired effects. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by VGTU Press and Informa UK Limited, [trading as Taylor & Francis Group].
Note:
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More details
DOI :
10.3846/16486897.2017.1307202
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
Review
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
31056
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:59
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
The effect of biochar on plant diseases: what should we learn while designing biochar substrates?
25
Frenkel, O., Department of Plant Pathology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Jaiswal, A.K., Department of Plant Pathology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
Elad, Y., Department of Plant Pathology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Lew, B., Soil Chemistry, Plant Nutrition and Microbiology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Kammann, C., Hochschule Geisenheim University, Geisenheim, Germany
Graber, E.R., Soil Chemistry, Plant Nutrition and Microbiology, The Volcani Center–Agricultural Research Organization, Rishon Lezion, Israel
The effect of biochar on plant diseases: what should we learn while designing biochar substrates?
The increasing demand for soilless substrates and rising environmental concerns about the use of non-renewable resources such as peat has led to the search for alternative constituents of growing mixtures for containerized plants. In this report we reviewed the works concerning biochar as constituent of growing media, targeting its influence on plant growth and plant disease. Biochar mostly has positive or neutral influences on plant growth compared with peat media when present in concentrations higher than 25% (v:v). However, studies of biochar influence on plant disease reveals that while lower concentrations (≤1%) of biochar often suppressed several diseases, higher concentrations (≥3%) were mostly ineffective or induced plant disease. For use as horticultural peat replacement, it is recommended that biochar feedstocks and concentrations be standardized and the potential effect of biochar on plant disease be considered, so that growers can rely on consistent and reproducible biochars for desired effects. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by VGTU Press and Informa UK Limited, [trading as Taylor & Francis Group].
Scientific Publication
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