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Acta Horticulturae
Raviv, M., Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Krassnovsky, A., Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Kritzman, G., Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Kirshner, B., Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Bacterial canker caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) is a serious disease of tomatoes. In recent years, the incidence of bacterial canker has increased, and the pathogen is now present in many tomato-production areas. The efficiency of pesticides which are used for controlling Cmm is limited and none of them is organically certified. The pathogen can survive several months in contaminated debris, which might serve as a major source of recontamination. Therefore treating plant residues is crucial for containment of the disease, especially in organic greenhouses. The objective of the current project was to define the composting conditions that affect Cmm survival. It was found that proper composting of infested tomato plants, mixed with cattle manure, including a thermophilic stage (~70 days above 45°C) led to a decline of 5-6 orders of magnitude in Cmm population. Additional declines of 2-3 orders of magnitude, leading to complete eradication of the pathogen, occurred during the mesophilic stage of the composting. It is suggested that proper composting can serve as a tool for disinfestation of plant residues. It should be further studied whether the resulting compost has a suppressive capacity against the disease, as was previously found for other compost types, including a tomato-based compost (Yogev et al., 2009).
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Minimizing the risk of bacterial canker spread through plant residue composting
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Raviv, M., Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Krassnovsky, A., Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe ya'Ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Kritzman, G., Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Kirshner, B., Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Minimizing the risk of bacterial canker spread through plant residue composting
Bacterial canker caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) is a serious disease of tomatoes. In recent years, the incidence of bacterial canker has increased, and the pathogen is now present in many tomato-production areas. The efficiency of pesticides which are used for controlling Cmm is limited and none of them is organically certified. The pathogen can survive several months in contaminated debris, which might serve as a major source of recontamination. Therefore treating plant residues is crucial for containment of the disease, especially in organic greenhouses. The objective of the current project was to define the composting conditions that affect Cmm survival. It was found that proper composting of infested tomato plants, mixed with cattle manure, including a thermophilic stage (~70 days above 45°C) led to a decline of 5-6 orders of magnitude in Cmm population. Additional declines of 2-3 orders of magnitude, leading to complete eradication of the pathogen, occurred during the mesophilic stage of the composting. It is suggested that proper composting can serve as a tool for disinfestation of plant residues. It should be further studied whether the resulting compost has a suppressive capacity against the disease, as was previously found for other compost types, including a tomato-based compost (Yogev et al., 2009).
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