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Acta Horticulturae
Shi, J.X., Kennedy-Leigh Center for Horticultural Research, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Goldschmidt, E.E., Kennedy-Leigh Center for Horticultural Research, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Goren, R., Kennedy-Leigh Center for Horticultural Research, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Porat, R., Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
The molecular responses of plants to anaerobic stress have been extensively studied in roots during and after flooding; far less has been done with ripening fruits, and very little is known about the behavior of citrus fruit during postharvest storage under restricted O 2 availability conditions. Using 'Star Ruby' grapefruit and 'Murcott' mandarin as plant materials and N 2 atmosphere treatment as the major experimental system, we studied the molecular responses of citrus fruits to anaerobiosis. The major response of citrus fruit to anaerobiosis is a metabolic shift towards ethanol fermentation, and the regulation of ethanol fermentation takes place at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ethylene is not a major player in the responses to anaerobiosis. 'Murcott' mandarin is more sensitive than 'Star Ruby' grapefruit to anaerobiosis, peel (flavedo) and juice vesicles respond differently to anaerobiosis. Taken together, our data reveal both general and citrus fruit-specific anaerobic-response mechanisms.
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Molecular responses of citrus fruit to anaerobic stress
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Shi, J.X., Kennedy-Leigh Center for Horticultural Research, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Goldschmidt, E.E., Kennedy-Leigh Center for Horticultural Research, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Goren, R., Kennedy-Leigh Center for Horticultural Research, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Porat, R., Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Molecular responses of citrus fruit to anaerobic stress
The molecular responses of plants to anaerobic stress have been extensively studied in roots during and after flooding; far less has been done with ripening fruits, and very little is known about the behavior of citrus fruit during postharvest storage under restricted O 2 availability conditions. Using 'Star Ruby' grapefruit and 'Murcott' mandarin as plant materials and N 2 atmosphere treatment as the major experimental system, we studied the molecular responses of citrus fruits to anaerobiosis. The major response of citrus fruit to anaerobiosis is a metabolic shift towards ethanol fermentation, and the regulation of ethanol fermentation takes place at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ethylene is not a major player in the responses to anaerobiosis. 'Murcott' mandarin is more sensitive than 'Star Ruby' grapefruit to anaerobiosis, peel (flavedo) and juice vesicles respond differently to anaerobiosis. Taken together, our data reveal both general and citrus fruit-specific anaerobic-response mechanisms.
Scientific Publication
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