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The effect of storage time on silage quality
Principal Investigator :
Weinberg, Zvi G.
;
.
Principal Investigator :
Partner :
Hen, Yaira
;
.
Other researchers :
Year:
2014
Project number :
421-0220-13
Research Foundation:
Research Foundation for Dairy and Beef Cattle Sciences
Domain :
אחסון ומדעי המזון
;
.
The findings in this report are experimental results and do not in any way constitute recommendations
Related Files :
Notes:

 

Abstract:

 

The study included three types of experiments: in bunker silos, in laboratory mini-silos and in commercial wrapped bales.
Commercial wheat and corn silages stored in bunker silos were sampled during their use on a nearby farm. Analysis included ensiling parameters, aerobic stability test and in vitro dry matter and NDF digestibility. During the sampling period management changes took place and therefore, it was difficult to point out consistent changes in the quality of the silages. Both the commercial wheat and corn silages were unstable upon aerobic exposure.
In addition, wheat (from the flowering and milk stages) and corn were ensiled in anaerobic 1.5 liter jars. Three jars from each silage were sampled after one and two weeks, and one, 3, 6 and 12 months after ensiling. In these silages lactic acid concentration peaked between one month and 3 months of storage, whereas acetic acid concentration increased constantly. Accordingly, aerobic stability of the silages improved with time. Dry matter losses increased while DM and NDF digestibility decreased with storage time.
Wheat silage was also prepared in wrapped bales and stored at a feeding center for 3 and 6 months. The silages from both storage periods were of good quality; those which were sampled after 6 months tended to be more stable during aerobic exposure.
In conclusion, during the first weeks after ensiling the pH values are still high and aerobic stability is poor; About one month after ensiling the silage is stable upon exposure to air and losses are still not too high. A long storage (over 6 months) results in high losses and substantial decrease in digestibility.

Editors' remarks:
animal feeding
cattle
food storage
forage and feed science
silage
Triticum
Zea mays
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More details
ID:
37250
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
13/09/2018 11:24
Research report
The effect of storage time on silage quality
421-0220-13
The findings in this report are experimental results and do not in any way constitute recommendations

 

Abstract:

 

The study included three types of experiments: in bunker silos, in laboratory mini-silos and in commercial wrapped bales.
Commercial wheat and corn silages stored in bunker silos were sampled during their use on a nearby farm. Analysis included ensiling parameters, aerobic stability test and in vitro dry matter and NDF digestibility. During the sampling period management changes took place and therefore, it was difficult to point out consistent changes in the quality of the silages. Both the commercial wheat and corn silages were unstable upon aerobic exposure.
In addition, wheat (from the flowering and milk stages) and corn were ensiled in anaerobic 1.5 liter jars. Three jars from each silage were sampled after one and two weeks, and one, 3, 6 and 12 months after ensiling. In these silages lactic acid concentration peaked between one month and 3 months of storage, whereas acetic acid concentration increased constantly. Accordingly, aerobic stability of the silages improved with time. Dry matter losses increased while DM and NDF digestibility decreased with storage time.
Wheat silage was also prepared in wrapped bales and stored at a feeding center for 3 and 6 months. The silages from both storage periods were of good quality; those which were sampled after 6 months tended to be more stable during aerobic exposure.
In conclusion, during the first weeks after ensiling the pH values are still high and aerobic stability is poor; About one month after ensiling the silage is stable upon exposure to air and losses are still not too high. A long storage (over 6 months) results in high losses and substantial decrease in digestibility.

Research report
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