Advanced Search
Journal of Insect Science

Henryk Czosnek

The Whitefly Functional Genomics Project has generated cDNA libraries from viruliferous and non-viruliferous adult whiteflies and from the insect developing stages. A microarray has been generated which contains 6,000 spots representing 4,860 contigs and singletons. We have started to use this platform to study gene expression during insect development and begomovirus vectoriality. However, since we estimate that the number of genes represented on the array is approximately one third to one forth of the genes of B. tabaci, the use of this platform may be limited. Hence we wondered whether the Drosophila microarray might be of use in studying whitefly gene expression. In recent years, many genomic projects took the advantage of an existing microarray platform of one organism to investigate the transcriptome of related organisms (cross-species hybridizations). We have used a microarray representing the entire D. melanogaster genome and compared RNA samples derived from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci to RNA derived from D. melanogaster. We found that a relatively large number of the Drosophila genes represented on the microarray hybridized with whitefly RNA samples. By comparing some of the genes, which hybridized to the D. melanogaster microarray, we were able to identify previously annotated genes in the whitefly. We have compared the expression of whitefly genes from four distinct developmental stages that hybridized to a RNA mixture extracted from D. melanogaster across developmental stages used as standard. As expected not all genes y were expressed in B. tabaci the same way they behaved in Drosophila. In Drosophila a very high transcriptional activity occurs during the oogenesis and embryogenesis stages; more than 85% of the Drosophila genes were expressed during the first 22 hours of the embryo development. By comparison, 2,378 spots on the Drosophila microarray hybridized with RNA from B. tabaci egg, compared with 1,744 spots with RNA from larvae, 1610 spots with RNA from pupae and 1,684 spots with RNA from adult. These results demonstrated that besides the conservation in sequence, which allowed hybridization, conservation in the temporal expression of some of the genes identified across development was also observed. Similarly heterologous hybridizations allowed discovering whitefly genes involved in stress response accompanying acquisition and retention of begomoviruses. In conclusion, in the absence of a microarray that represents the complete genome of Bemisia tabaci, one can extract valuable information on the biology of this inset by hybridizing whitefly RNA to the Drosophila microarray.

Fourth International Bemisia Workshop International Whitefly Genomics Workshop, December 3–8, 2006, Duck Key, Florida, USA

Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Analysis of Bemisia tabaci gene expression using Drosophila microarrays [abstract]
8

Henryk Czosnek

Analysis of Bemisia tabaci gene expression using Drosophila microarrays

The Whitefly Functional Genomics Project has generated cDNA libraries from viruliferous and non-viruliferous adult whiteflies and from the insect developing stages. A microarray has been generated which contains 6,000 spots representing 4,860 contigs and singletons. We have started to use this platform to study gene expression during insect development and begomovirus vectoriality. However, since we estimate that the number of genes represented on the array is approximately one third to one forth of the genes of B. tabaci, the use of this platform may be limited. Hence we wondered whether the Drosophila microarray might be of use in studying whitefly gene expression. In recent years, many genomic projects took the advantage of an existing microarray platform of one organism to investigate the transcriptome of related organisms (cross-species hybridizations). We have used a microarray representing the entire D. melanogaster genome and compared RNA samples derived from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci to RNA derived from D. melanogaster. We found that a relatively large number of the Drosophila genes represented on the microarray hybridized with whitefly RNA samples. By comparing some of the genes, which hybridized to the D. melanogaster microarray, we were able to identify previously annotated genes in the whitefly. We have compared the expression of whitefly genes from four distinct developmental stages that hybridized to a RNA mixture extracted from D. melanogaster across developmental stages used as standard. As expected not all genes y were expressed in B. tabaci the same way they behaved in Drosophila. In Drosophila a very high transcriptional activity occurs during the oogenesis and embryogenesis stages; more than 85% of the Drosophila genes were expressed during the first 22 hours of the embryo development. By comparison, 2,378 spots on the Drosophila microarray hybridized with RNA from B. tabaci egg, compared with 1,744 spots with RNA from larvae, 1610 spots with RNA from pupae and 1,684 spots with RNA from adult. These results demonstrated that besides the conservation in sequence, which allowed hybridization, conservation in the temporal expression of some of the genes identified across development was also observed. Similarly heterologous hybridizations allowed discovering whitefly genes involved in stress response accompanying acquisition and retention of begomoviruses. In conclusion, in the absence of a microarray that represents the complete genome of Bemisia tabaci, one can extract valuable information on the biology of this inset by hybridizing whitefly RNA to the Drosophila microarray.

Fourth International Bemisia Workshop International Whitefly Genomics Workshop, December 3–8, 2006, Duck Key, Florida, USA

Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in