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Biofilm‐forming Bacillus species are often involved in persistent contamination and spoilage of dairy products. Therefore, they present a major microbiological challenge in the field of dairy food quality and safety. Due to a vast physiological versatility, Bacillus species can survive in various sections of dairy manufacturing plants, leading to high risk in product spoilage and potential dissemination of foodborne diseases. Furthermore, biofilm and heat‐resistant spore formation make these bacteria challenging to eliminate. Thus, some strategies have been employed to remove, prevent, or delay the formation of Bacillus biofilms in the dairy industry, but with limited success. Lack of understanding in the Bacillus biofilm structure and behavior in conditions relevant to dairy‐associated environments could partially account for this situation. Current paper reviews dairy‐associated biofilm formation by Bacillus species, with particular attention to the role of biofilm in Bacillus species adaptation and survival in a dairy processing environment. Besides, relevant model systems are discussed for developing novel antimicrobial approaches to improve the quality of dairy food.

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Role of Bacillus species in biofilm persistence and emerging antibiofilm strategies in the dairy industry
Role of Bacillus species in biofilm persistence and emerging antibiofilm strategies in the dairy industry

Biofilm‐forming Bacillus species are often involved in persistent contamination and spoilage of dairy products. Therefore, they present a major microbiological challenge in the field of dairy food quality and safety. Due to a vast physiological versatility, Bacillus species can survive in various sections of dairy manufacturing plants, leading to high risk in product spoilage and potential dissemination of foodborne diseases. Furthermore, biofilm and heat‐resistant spore formation make these bacteria challenging to eliminate. Thus, some strategies have been employed to remove, prevent, or delay the formation of Bacillus biofilms in the dairy industry, but with limited success. Lack of understanding in the Bacillus biofilm structure and behavior in conditions relevant to dairy‐associated environments could partially account for this situation. Current paper reviews dairy‐associated biofilm formation by Bacillus species, with particular attention to the role of biofilm in Bacillus species adaptation and survival in a dairy processing environment. Besides, relevant model systems are discussed for developing novel antimicrobial approaches to improve the quality of dairy food.

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