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Sharma, J., Department of Environmental Science & Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana  124001, India;
Kumar, S.S., Department of Environmental Science & Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana  124001, India, Department of Environmental Sciences, J.C. Bose University of Science and Technology, YMCA, Mathura Rd, Sector 6, Faridabad, Haryana  121006, India;
Kumar, V., Centre for Rural Development & Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas - 110016, New Delhi, India;
Mathimani, T., Department of Energy and Environment, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu  620015, India;
Bishnoi, N.R., Department of Environmental Science & Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana  124001, India;
Pugazhendhi, A., Innovative Green Product Synthesis and Renewable Environment Development Research Group, Faculty of Environment and Labour Safety, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam

Algae have been considered as a best feedstock for combating CO2. In the present study, two mixed microalgal cultures i.e. MAC1 and MAC2 were evaluated in batch mode with an extraneous supply of CO2 from the fermentation of wheat straw. Both the mixed cultures displayed promising CO2 sequestration potentials of 287 and 263 mg L−1d−1, respectively. The removal efficiencies in terms of ammonium, phosphate, chemical oxygen demand, and nitrate were found to be 87%, 78%, 68% and 65%, respectively. Enriching the tolerance of the microalgal consortia to CO2 supply and wastewater as the nutrient source significantly enhanced the lipid production for both the microalgae consortia. Lipid contents of MAC1 and MAC2 were observed to be 12.29 & 11.37%, respectively while the biomass yield from both the consortia was 0.36 g L-1. Total chlorophyll and protein contents of MAC1 and MAC2 were 14.27 & 12.28 µgmL−1 and 0.13 & 0.15 mgmL−1, respectively. Both the consortia found to have significant potential for CO2 sequestration, wastewater remediation and biofuel production.

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Upgrading of microalgal consortia with CO2 from fermentation of wheat straw for the phycoremediation of domestic wastewater
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Sharma, J., Department of Environmental Science & Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana  124001, India;
Kumar, S.S., Department of Environmental Science & Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana  124001, India, Department of Environmental Sciences, J.C. Bose University of Science and Technology, YMCA, Mathura Rd, Sector 6, Faridabad, Haryana  121006, India;
Kumar, V., Centre for Rural Development & Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas - 110016, New Delhi, India;
Mathimani, T., Department of Energy and Environment, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu  620015, India;
Bishnoi, N.R., Department of Environmental Science & Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana  124001, India;
Pugazhendhi, A., Innovative Green Product Synthesis and Renewable Environment Development Research Group, Faculty of Environment and Labour Safety, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam

Upgrading of microalgal consortia with CO2 from fermentation of wheat straw for the phycoremediation of domestic wastewater

Algae have been considered as a best feedstock for combating CO2. In the present study, two mixed microalgal cultures i.e. MAC1 and MAC2 were evaluated in batch mode with an extraneous supply of CO2 from the fermentation of wheat straw. Both the mixed cultures displayed promising CO2 sequestration potentials of 287 and 263 mg L−1d−1, respectively. The removal efficiencies in terms of ammonium, phosphate, chemical oxygen demand, and nitrate were found to be 87%, 78%, 68% and 65%, respectively. Enriching the tolerance of the microalgal consortia to CO2 supply and wastewater as the nutrient source significantly enhanced the lipid production for both the microalgae consortia. Lipid contents of MAC1 and MAC2 were observed to be 12.29 & 11.37%, respectively while the biomass yield from both the consortia was 0.36 g L-1. Total chlorophyll and protein contents of MAC1 and MAC2 were 14.27 & 12.28 µgmL−1 and 0.13 & 0.15 mgmL−1, respectively. Both the consortia found to have significant potential for CO2 sequestration, wastewater remediation and biofuel production.

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