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Shebis, Y., Agro-Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Research Center, Department of Food Science, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Rishon Lezion, Israel, Faculty of Agriculture, Biochemistry and Food Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;
Kumar, V.B., Department of Chemistry and Kanbar Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel;
Gedanken, A., Department of Chemistry and Kanbar Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel;

The current study explores the formation of active eco-friendly materials capable of preventing microbial contamination using in situ ultrasonic grafting of vanillin, curcumin and a curcumin-vanillin mixture on the surfaces of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and chitosan films. Spectroscopic, microscopic, physical and mechanical studies revealed that the films grafted with curcumin-vanillin mixture demonstrate improved mechanical properties and higher degree of order. The bioactivity of the prepared films was tested on food model, fresh-cut melons and films with a deposited curcumin-vanillin mixture showed superior antibacterial properties. For instance, this mixture-grafted on CMC films demonstrated a total inhibition of yeast/mold proliferation during 12 days. The HR-SEM studies of the mixture-grafted films revealed the presence of crystalline structures. Cooperative crystallization effect between the curcumin (the crystal maker) and the volatile vanillin is suggested to be responsible for the observed effects. According to our knowledge, this is the first usage of co-crystallization method in surface deposition. The results point out to a general strategy of combining a crystal maker agent with a volatile active agent during in situ sonochemical deposition to form bioactive materials that can be further used for food packaging, agriculture, pharmacology and more.

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Cooperative crystallization effect in the formation of sonochemically grafted active materials based on polysaccharides
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Shebis, Y., Agro-Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Research Center, Department of Food Science, Agriculture Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Rishon Lezion, Israel, Faculty of Agriculture, Biochemistry and Food Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;
Kumar, V.B., Department of Chemistry and Kanbar Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel;
Gedanken, A., Department of Chemistry and Kanbar Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel;

Cooperative crystallization effect in the formation of sonochemically grafted active materials based on polysaccharides

The current study explores the formation of active eco-friendly materials capable of preventing microbial contamination using in situ ultrasonic grafting of vanillin, curcumin and a curcumin-vanillin mixture on the surfaces of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and chitosan films. Spectroscopic, microscopic, physical and mechanical studies revealed that the films grafted with curcumin-vanillin mixture demonstrate improved mechanical properties and higher degree of order. The bioactivity of the prepared films was tested on food model, fresh-cut melons and films with a deposited curcumin-vanillin mixture showed superior antibacterial properties. For instance, this mixture-grafted on CMC films demonstrated a total inhibition of yeast/mold proliferation during 12 days. The HR-SEM studies of the mixture-grafted films revealed the presence of crystalline structures. Cooperative crystallization effect between the curcumin (the crystal maker) and the volatile vanillin is suggested to be responsible for the observed effects. According to our knowledge, this is the first usage of co-crystallization method in surface deposition. The results point out to a general strategy of combining a crystal maker agent with a volatile active agent during in situ sonochemical deposition to form bioactive materials that can be further used for food packaging, agriculture, pharmacology and more.

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