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Journal of Plant Pathology

Jacqueline Fletcher - National Institute for Microbial Forensics & Food and Agricultural Biosecurity, Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA.
 Abraham Gamliel - Laboratory for Pest Management Research, Institute of Agricultural Engineering ARO, The Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel.

Maria Lodovica Gullino - AGROINNOVA, Università degli Studi di Torino, Grugliasco, Italy.
Simon J. McKirdy - Harry Butler Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA, Australia.
Grant R. Smith -  The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Lincoln, New Zealand.
James P. Stack - Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.

Among the many responsibilities of the worldwide scientific community are advancing the knowledge base that underpins each scientific discipline, addressing the pressing scientific issues of the day (e.g., emerging infectious diseases, food security, and climate change), and perhaps most importantly, educating and training subsequent generations of scientists. Yet, around the globe, advances in scientific and communications technology, proliferation and mining of data, and increasing financial constraints of university systems have led to fundamental changes in our institutions of higher learning. Increasing emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to problem solving in agriculture add to the complexity of providing robust preparation for the plant pathologists of the future. Thus, as the U.N. recognizes the year 2020 as the International Year of Plant Health, it is fair to ask if current approaches to graduate education in plant pathology are adequate to meet current and anticipated challenges and if the outcomes can be improved.

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A fresh look at graduate education in Plant Pathology in a changing world: global needs and perspectives

Jacqueline Fletcher - National Institute for Microbial Forensics & Food and Agricultural Biosecurity, Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA.
 Abraham Gamliel - Laboratory for Pest Management Research, Institute of Agricultural Engineering ARO, The Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel.

Maria Lodovica Gullino - AGROINNOVA, Università degli Studi di Torino, Grugliasco, Italy.
Simon J. McKirdy - Harry Butler Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA, Australia.
Grant R. Smith -  The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Lincoln, New Zealand.
James P. Stack - Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.

A fresh look at graduate education in Plant Pathology in a changing world: global needs and perspectives

Among the many responsibilities of the worldwide scientific community are advancing the knowledge base that underpins each scientific discipline, addressing the pressing scientific issues of the day (e.g., emerging infectious diseases, food security, and climate change), and perhaps most importantly, educating and training subsequent generations of scientists. Yet, around the globe, advances in scientific and communications technology, proliferation and mining of data, and increasing financial constraints of university systems have led to fundamental changes in our institutions of higher learning. Increasing emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to problem solving in agriculture add to the complexity of providing robust preparation for the plant pathologists of the future. Thus, as the U.N. recognizes the year 2020 as the International Year of Plant Health, it is fair to ask if current approaches to graduate education in plant pathology are adequate to meet current and anticipated challenges and if the outcomes can be improved.

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