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Plant Signaling and Behavior

Lilach Iasur Kruh - Department of Biotechnology Engineering, ORT Braude College, Karmiel, Israel;  

 

Phelipanche aegyptiaca is an obligate holo-parasitic weedlacking a functional photosynthetic system, which subsists on roots of a wide range of host crops, causing severe losses in yield quality and quantity. The parasite and its host are connected through their vascular system, forming a unique ecological system that enables the exchange of various substances. In a previous study, it was suggested that endophytic bacteria, which naturally inhabit the internal tissues of plants, can also be transmitted from the parasitic weed to its host and vice versa. In the current study, we investigate the characteristics of a previously isolated Pseudomonas sp. PhelS10 strain using both biochemical and molecular methods. This isolate was obtained from tomato plant tissue and was able to reduce P. aegyptiaca parasitism, and thus it may serve as a biocontrol agent. Our results revealed that production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal (PQS) was 2.1 times higher than that of the standard Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain (PAO1), which contributed to a 22% higher biofilm formation capability. PhelS10 strain was detected in the xylem of tomato plants using FISH analysis. In addition, PhelS10 strain was found in the parasitic weed’s inner tissues, confirming the hypothesis that endophytic bacteria traffic between the host plant and its parasitic weed.

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Characterization of an endophytic bacterium (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), originating from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), and its ability to inhabit the parasitic weed Phelipanche aegyptiaca

Lilach Iasur Kruh - Department of Biotechnology Engineering, ORT Braude College, Karmiel, Israel;  

 

Characterization of an endophytic bacterium (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), originating from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), and its ability to inhabit the parasitic weed Phelipanche aegyptiaca

Phelipanche aegyptiaca is an obligate holo-parasitic weedlacking a functional photosynthetic system, which subsists on roots of a wide range of host crops, causing severe losses in yield quality and quantity. The parasite and its host are connected through their vascular system, forming a unique ecological system that enables the exchange of various substances. In a previous study, it was suggested that endophytic bacteria, which naturally inhabit the internal tissues of plants, can also be transmitted from the parasitic weed to its host and vice versa. In the current study, we investigate the characteristics of a previously isolated Pseudomonas sp. PhelS10 strain using both biochemical and molecular methods. This isolate was obtained from tomato plant tissue and was able to reduce P. aegyptiaca parasitism, and thus it may serve as a biocontrol agent. Our results revealed that production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal (PQS) was 2.1 times higher than that of the standard Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain (PAO1), which contributed to a 22% higher biofilm formation capability. PhelS10 strain was detected in the xylem of tomato plants using FISH analysis. In addition, PhelS10 strain was found in the parasitic weed’s inner tissues, confirming the hypothesis that endophytic bacteria traffic between the host plant and its parasitic weed.

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