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Amit K. Jaiswal - Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Institute of Plant Protection, The Volcani Center (ARO), 7505101, Rishon Lezion, Israel; Department of Soil Chemistry, Plant Nutrition and Microbiology, Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, The Volcani Center (ARO), 7505101, Rishon Lezion, Israel; Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 761001, Rehovot, Israel; Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
 

Molecular mechanisms associated with biochar-elicited suppression of soilborne plant diseases and improved plant performance are not well understood. A stem base inoculation approach was used to explore the ability of biochar to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against crown rot caused by a soilborne pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis lycopersici. RNA-seq transcriptome profiling of tomato, and experiments with jasmonic and salycilic acid deficient tomato mutants, were performed to elucidate the in planta molecular mechanisms involved in induced resistance. Biochar (produced from greenhouse plant wastes) was found to mediate systemic resistance against Fusarium crown rot and to simultaneously improve tomato plant growth and physiological parameters by up to 63%. Transcriptomic analysis (RNA-seq) of tomato demonstrated that biochar had a priming effect on gene expression and upregulated the pathways and genes associated with plant defense and growth such as jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, cytokinins, auxin and synthesis of flavonoid, phenylpropanoids and cell wall. In contrast, biosynthesis and signaling of the salicylic acid pathway was downregulated. Upregulation of genes and pathways involved in plant defense and plant growth may partially explain the significant disease suppression and improvement in plant performance observed in the presence of biochar.

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Molecular insights into biochar-mediated plant growth promotion and systemic resistance in tomato against Fusarium crown and root rot disease
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Amit K. Jaiswal - Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Institute of Plant Protection, The Volcani Center (ARO), 7505101, Rishon Lezion, Israel; Department of Soil Chemistry, Plant Nutrition and Microbiology, Institute of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, The Volcani Center (ARO), 7505101, Rishon Lezion, Israel; Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 761001, Rehovot, Israel; Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
 

Molecular insights into biochar-mediated plant growth promotion and systemic resistance in tomato against Fusarium crown and root rot disease

Molecular mechanisms associated with biochar-elicited suppression of soilborne plant diseases and improved plant performance are not well understood. A stem base inoculation approach was used to explore the ability of biochar to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against crown rot caused by a soilborne pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis lycopersici. RNA-seq transcriptome profiling of tomato, and experiments with jasmonic and salycilic acid deficient tomato mutants, were performed to elucidate the in planta molecular mechanisms involved in induced resistance. Biochar (produced from greenhouse plant wastes) was found to mediate systemic resistance against Fusarium crown rot and to simultaneously improve tomato plant growth and physiological parameters by up to 63%. Transcriptomic analysis (RNA-seq) of tomato demonstrated that biochar had a priming effect on gene expression and upregulated the pathways and genes associated with plant defense and growth such as jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, cytokinins, auxin and synthesis of flavonoid, phenylpropanoids and cell wall. In contrast, biosynthesis and signaling of the salicylic acid pathway was downregulated. Upregulation of genes and pathways involved in plant defense and plant growth may partially explain the significant disease suppression and improvement in plant performance observed in the presence of biochar.

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