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Lazare, S. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel 
Zipori, I. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel
  
Cohen, Y. - Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Rishon-LeZion, Israel
Haberman, A. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel
 
Goldshtein, E. - Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Rishon-LeZion, Israel
 
Ron, Y. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel
 
Rotschild, R. - Jojoba Israel, Kibbutz Hatzerim, Israel
 
Dag, A. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel

Commercial pruning practice in jojoba plantations is traditionally dictated by maintenance requirements only. It enables machine movement between the plants and efficient harvest but is not designed to maximize long-term productivity. In this study, mechanical and manual pruning approaches were tested in two cultivars in a mature jojoba plantation, in comparison to the common practice. These new approaches were designed to enable better light penetration into the canopy, aiming to improve growth and productivity. As jojoba is an alternate bearing crop, the vegetative and reproductive performances were observed over four years, by remote sensing and manual measurements. The pruning type and strategy had a significant effect on growth, with a distinction between the two tested cultivars. Top-pruning methods were found to best encourage new branching and yield, while side-pruning practices were less effective. Several treatments, including hedge pruning, attenuated or eliminated the alternation cycle. We conclude that using the proposed pruning practices would be beneficial in jojoba cultivation, and that the specific method should be suited to the cultivar characteristics. 

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Jojoba pruning: New practices to rejuvenate the plant, improve yield and reduce alternate bearing
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Lazare, S. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel 
Zipori, I. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel
  
Cohen, Y. - Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Rishon-LeZion, Israel
Haberman, A. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel
 
Goldshtein, E. - Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Rishon-LeZion, Israel
 
Ron, Y. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel
 
Rotschild, R. - Jojoba Israel, Kibbutz Hatzerim, Israel
 
Dag, A. - Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat, Israel

Jojoba pruning: New practices to rejuvenate the plant, improve yield and reduce alternate bearing

Commercial pruning practice in jojoba plantations is traditionally dictated by maintenance requirements only. It enables machine movement between the plants and efficient harvest but is not designed to maximize long-term productivity. In this study, mechanical and manual pruning approaches were tested in two cultivars in a mature jojoba plantation, in comparison to the common practice. These new approaches were designed to enable better light penetration into the canopy, aiming to improve growth and productivity. As jojoba is an alternate bearing crop, the vegetative and reproductive performances were observed over four years, by remote sensing and manual measurements. The pruning type and strategy had a significant effect on growth, with a distinction between the two tested cultivars. Top-pruning methods were found to best encourage new branching and yield, while side-pruning practices were less effective. Several treatments, including hedge pruning, attenuated or eliminated the alternation cycle. We conclude that using the proposed pruning practices would be beneficial in jojoba cultivation, and that the specific method should be suited to the cultivar characteristics. 

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