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*D. Blohm - University of Bremen, Germany. 
F. Bonhomme - UM2-IFREMER-CNRS, Montpellier, France . 
G. Carvalho - University of Wales, Bangor, UK. 
D. Crosetti -  ICRAM, Rome, Italy. 
T. Cross - University College Cork, Ireland. 
G. Dahle - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
D. Danancher - University of Oviedo, Spain. 
R. H. Devlin - Fisheries and Ocean Canada, Vancouver, Canada. 
E. Garcia-Vazquez - University of Oviedo, Spain.
K. Glover - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway.
B. Guinand - UM2-IFREMER-CNRS, Montpellier, France . 
G. Hulata - Institute of Animal Science, Bet Dagan, Israel .
K. Jørstad - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
K. Kohlmann - Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany.
S. Lapègue - IFREMER, La Tremblade, France.

P. McGinnity - Marine Institute, Furnace, Ireland. 
G. Marteinsdottir - University of Iceland, Iceland.  
P. Moran - University of Vigo, Spain. 
C. Primmer - University of Turku, Finland. 
P. A. Prodöhl - Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
M. L. Rise - Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John’s, Canada. 
C. Saavedra - Instituto de Acuicultura de Torre la Sal-CSIC, Castellón, Spain. 
Ø. Skaala - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
T. Svåsand - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
A. Triantafyllidis - University of Thessaloniki, Greece. 
E. Verspoor - FRS Marine Laboratory, Scotland, UK.  

Th e potential genetic eff ects of aquaculture activities have aroused a great deal of concern, and the perceived risks are often associated with interbreeding with natural populations and the adverse eff ects of ecosystem interactions (1). Th e EU-funded project Genimpact (http://genimpact.imr.no) reviews specifi c aspects of potential risks and concerns on interbreeding and aquaculture-ecosystem interactions. In workshop 2, emphasis was given on the current knowledge and state of art of the tools available for the study of monitoring escapees of the species under study i.e. Atlantic salmon, Atlantic cod, European sea bass, gilthead sea bream, turbot, common carp, Atlantic halibut, scallops, mussels, oysters (Pacifi c oyster and European fl at oyster) and European lobster. Additionally emphasis was given on the future research objectives for better and improved monitoring methods.

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Assessment of tools for identifying the genetic origin of fish and monitoring their occurrence in the wild

*D. Blohm - University of Bremen, Germany. 
F. Bonhomme - UM2-IFREMER-CNRS, Montpellier, France . 
G. Carvalho - University of Wales, Bangor, UK. 
D. Crosetti -  ICRAM, Rome, Italy. 
T. Cross - University College Cork, Ireland. 
G. Dahle - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
D. Danancher - University of Oviedo, Spain. 
R. H. Devlin - Fisheries and Ocean Canada, Vancouver, Canada. 
E. Garcia-Vazquez - University of Oviedo, Spain.
K. Glover - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway.
B. Guinand - UM2-IFREMER-CNRS, Montpellier, France . 
G. Hulata - Institute of Animal Science, Bet Dagan, Israel .
K. Jørstad - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
K. Kohlmann - Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany.
S. Lapègue - IFREMER, La Tremblade, France.

P. McGinnity - Marine Institute, Furnace, Ireland. 
G. Marteinsdottir - University of Iceland, Iceland.  
P. Moran - University of Vigo, Spain. 
C. Primmer - University of Turku, Finland. 
P. A. Prodöhl - Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
M. L. Rise - Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John’s, Canada. 
C. Saavedra - Instituto de Acuicultura de Torre la Sal-CSIC, Castellón, Spain. 
Ø. Skaala - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
T. Svåsand - Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. 
A. Triantafyllidis - University of Thessaloniki, Greece. 
E. Verspoor - FRS Marine Laboratory, Scotland, UK.  

Assessment of tools for identifying the genetic origin of fish and monitoring their occurrence in the wild

Th e potential genetic eff ects of aquaculture activities have aroused a great deal of concern, and the perceived risks are often associated with interbreeding with natural populations and the adverse eff ects of ecosystem interactions (1). Th e EU-funded project Genimpact (http://genimpact.imr.no) reviews specifi c aspects of potential risks and concerns on interbreeding and aquaculture-ecosystem interactions. In workshop 2, emphasis was given on the current knowledge and state of art of the tools available for the study of monitoring escapees of the species under study i.e. Atlantic salmon, Atlantic cod, European sea bass, gilthead sea bream, turbot, common carp, Atlantic halibut, scallops, mussels, oysters (Pacifi c oyster and European fl at oyster) and European lobster. Additionally emphasis was given on the future research objectives for better and improved monitoring methods.

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