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The management of burned forests in Israel
Year:
2000
Authors :
Perevolotsky, Avi
;
.
Volume :
Co-Authors:

Gidi Ne’eman1 and Avi Perevolotsky

Facilitators :
From page:
1
To page:
13
(
Total pages:
13
)
Abstract:
The traditional agricultural practice, livestock grazing and woodcutting, has declined since the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948. Since then, the state has declared 50,000 ha as nature reserves, and 80,000 ha have been intensively afforestated in the Mediterranean part of the country. As a result there has been a rapid growth in plant biomass namely in fuel load, in open areas. In contrast to the western Mediterranean basin, there are no natural fires caused by lightning during summer thunderstorms in Israel (Vasquez and Moreno 1998a). However, the high intensity of human interference at the border of intensive agricultural lands, villages and urban areas, along road sides and in picnic areas combined with fires set for political reasons, have caused a continuous increase in the number of fires events. Subsequently, the combination of increased fuel loads and ignition rate has caused an increase also in the frequency severity and the average size of the burned areas. This trend still appears to be on the rise. Most of the pine forests in Israel are part of a large afforestation effort that has taken place over the last 70 years. Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) represents the only native pine species in Israel and its largest natural forests are on Mt. Carmel. Natural populations of P.  halepensis in Israel are of unique genetic composition (Schiller et al. 1985, Grünwald et al.
1986).
Note:
Related Files :
forest
forest management
Forests
Israel
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DOI :
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Publication Type:
Book chapter
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
55350
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
08/06/2021 15:07
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
The management of burned forests in Israel

Gidi Ne’eman1 and Avi Perevolotsky

The traditional agricultural practice, livestock grazing and woodcutting, has declined since the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948. Since then, the state has declared 50,000 ha as nature reserves, and 80,000 ha have been intensively afforestated in the Mediterranean part of the country. As a result there has been a rapid growth in plant biomass namely in fuel load, in open areas. In contrast to the western Mediterranean basin, there are no natural fires caused by lightning during summer thunderstorms in Israel (Vasquez and Moreno 1998a). However, the high intensity of human interference at the border of intensive agricultural lands, villages and urban areas, along road sides and in picnic areas combined with fires set for political reasons, have caused a continuous increase in the number of fires events. Subsequently, the combination of increased fuel loads and ignition rate has caused an increase also in the frequency severity and the average size of the burned areas. This trend still appears to be on the rise. Most of the pine forests in Israel are part of a large afforestation effort that has taken place over the last 70 years. Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) represents the only native pine species in Israel and its largest natural forests are on Mt. Carmel. Natural populations of P.  halepensis in Israel are of unique genetic composition (Schiller et al. 1985, Grünwald et al.
1986).
Scientific Publication
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