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Developing Bio-inspired Nano-technologies to Inhibit Biofilm Formation Associated to Dairy Industry
Year:
2017
Source of publication :
Volcani Voice
Authors :
Ostrova, Ievgeniia
;
.
Shemesh, Moshe
;
.
Volume :
4
Co-Authors:
Facilitators :
From page:
22
To page:
25
(
Total pages:
4
)
Abstract:

Microbial damages caused by biofilm bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to the safety and quality of milk products. Many bacteria in industrial settings tend to form multicellular communities known as biofilms. Bacterial cells are extremely protected in the biofilms due to a selfproduced matrix that consists mainly of sugars and proteins, which form a physical barrier. Biofilms are not only a potential source of contamination, but can also increase corrosion rate, reduce heat transfer and increase fluid frictional resistance. Therefore, mitigation of biofilm forming species will enable the development of novel means and technologies for preventing biofilm formation and subsequent contamination of dairy products. In our laboratory, we are developing different approaches for surface modification in order to control and minimize bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation.

Note:
Related Files :
bacteria
biofilm
dairy industry
food safety
food technology
nanotechnology
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More details
DOI :
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
55608
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
15/07/2021 14:32
Scientific Publication
Developing Bio-inspired Nano-technologies to Inhibit Biofilm Formation Associated to Dairy Industry
4
Developing Bio-inspired Nano-technologies to Inhibit Biofilm Formation Associated to Dairy Industry

Microbial damages caused by biofilm bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to the safety and quality of milk products. Many bacteria in industrial settings tend to form multicellular communities known as biofilms. Bacterial cells are extremely protected in the biofilms due to a selfproduced matrix that consists mainly of sugars and proteins, which form a physical barrier. Biofilms are not only a potential source of contamination, but can also increase corrosion rate, reduce heat transfer and increase fluid frictional resistance. Therefore, mitigation of biofilm forming species will enable the development of novel means and technologies for preventing biofilm formation and subsequent contamination of dairy products. In our laboratory, we are developing different approaches for surface modification in order to control and minimize bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation.

Scientific Publication
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