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Novel approaches to improve microbial quality and safety of dairy products
Year:
2015
Source of publication :
Volcani Voice
Authors :
Shemesh, Moshe
;
.
Volume :
Special issue - Facing challenges in postharvest food losses, April 28-30 (Agritech)
Co-Authors:
Facilitators :
From page:
38
To page:
43
(
Total pages:
6
)
Abstract:

Microbial damages caused by bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to the safety and quality of milk products. Many bacteria in industrial settings tend to form multicellular communities known as biofilms. Individual cells in the biofilms are deeply embedded and protected by a selfproduced matrix that consists mainly of sugars and proteins, which form a physical barrier. Biofilms represent one of the most successful strategies for bacteria to survive unfavorable environmental conditions, for instance in the food industry. In order to ensure the safety and quality of dairy food, there is a fundamental requirement of effective cleaning and sanitizing procedures. Otherwise, residual spores and bacteria on inadequately cleaned surfaces can quickly form multicellular biofilms that are extremely difficult to remove. Biofilms are not only a potential source of contamination, but can also increase corrosion rate, reduce heat transfer and increase fluid frictional resistance. Therefore, mitigation of biofilm forming species will enable the development of novel means and technologies for preventing biofilm formation and subsequent contamination of dairy products. We are currently developing three different approaches to control biofilm formation: (i) a model system to evaluate the cleaning and sanitizing effectiveness of milking equipments on dairy farms; (ii) a novel superhydrophobic surfaces which minimizes bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation; (iii) searching for natural molecules capable of inhibiting the signal transduction pathway responsible for biofilm formation.

Note:
Related Files :
bacteria
biofilm
Dairy products
food loss
food microbiology
food quality
food safety
food technology
milk
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More details
DOI :
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
55616
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
18/07/2021 11:46
Scientific Publication
Novel approaches to improve microbial quality and safety of dairy products
Special issue - Facing challenges in postharvest food losses, April 28-30 (Agritech)
Novel approaches to improve microbial quality and safety of dairy products

Microbial damages caused by bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to the safety and quality of milk products. Many bacteria in industrial settings tend to form multicellular communities known as biofilms. Individual cells in the biofilms are deeply embedded and protected by a selfproduced matrix that consists mainly of sugars and proteins, which form a physical barrier. Biofilms represent one of the most successful strategies for bacteria to survive unfavorable environmental conditions, for instance in the food industry. In order to ensure the safety and quality of dairy food, there is a fundamental requirement of effective cleaning and sanitizing procedures. Otherwise, residual spores and bacteria on inadequately cleaned surfaces can quickly form multicellular biofilms that are extremely difficult to remove. Biofilms are not only a potential source of contamination, but can also increase corrosion rate, reduce heat transfer and increase fluid frictional resistance. Therefore, mitigation of biofilm forming species will enable the development of novel means and technologies for preventing biofilm formation and subsequent contamination of dairy products. We are currently developing three different approaches to control biofilm formation: (i) a model system to evaluate the cleaning and sanitizing effectiveness of milking equipments on dairy farms; (ii) a novel superhydrophobic surfaces which minimizes bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation; (iii) searching for natural molecules capable of inhibiting the signal transduction pathway responsible for biofilm formation.

Scientific Publication
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